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Posts Tagged ‘writting’


A few weeks ago I sent my tracker friend the web link for my new video on how to field dress a snowshoe hare. I had self recorded the process while I was out in the woods. At first his response to my email made me smile but I also found it quite complimentary. In just a few sentences he told me that I should have been born during the time of Ernest Hemingway and gave me reasons why.

In one of my previous blog entries, I wrote about old hunting books and their author’s and also focused on the writing styles and the fact that they are so different from today’s authors. Is hunting becoming just another fashionable sport? Or is it still a deeply engrained pastime found in our North American blood that is shared by families and friends?

Norman Strung in his book “Deer Hunting” calls himself a “Romantic” and I have to say I truly speak his language. It is quite a different romance then what we are used to, I like to believe it is rather a desire to keep things as they are in their original form. For me the word “Raw” is much better suited and it reveals the true origins.

When I read books on hunting and the outdoors, I become in sort a prospector who is panning for gold. I combine my extensive field experience with the theory that the books I have read provided me with, and then overtime I have developed in turn this natural ability to separate the gold from the black sands. I find myself collecting precious gold which is ultimately knowledge from books, videos and the types of sources available including more field experience.

Authors like Norman Strung and Larry Koller and many other authors listed on my OKB page have a gift to write great material, which is extremely rich in knowledge both in the theoretical and practical sense. Their pages are gold.

As a hunter I am constantly trying to learn more not just about hunting but about wildlife management systems and any element that surrounds this great sport. Great authors like the one’s I have listed make it possible for me to be closer in reaching my goal in becoming a wealthier man in knowledge.

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Whether you are in an elevator filled with strangers or waiting in line at Tim Horton’s coffee shop, one of the easiest ice breakers to get rid of that dreaded silence is to talk about the weather, especially here in Canada.

The weather is not only a social rescue tool but I also consider it to be one of the most important elements no pun intended in which we need to have some understanding and also take into consideration during the preparatory phase of your hunt and during the outing.

There is no need to become a meteorologist in order to have a more successful hunt but if you possess some of their knowledge, it can definitely enhance your chances of success. For example understanding how the weather impacts specific birds can be advantageous during a duck hunt, thinning air is harder to fly in. Birds sit it out before a storm. The skill of being able to interpret the warm and cold fronts is also very important during migratory bird hunting.

I always consult the Weather Network web site the night before my outing, thus allowing me to pack the right gear and to dress accordingly, so that I may hunt comfortably in any time of year.

I am always trying to learn more about the weather, so that I may be better prepared while out on a hunt, thus trying to improve my chances of a harvest but also to be prepared in the event that the weather changes. Knowing which birds or mammals is affected by the weather and how I may use this to my advantage.

One of my greatest treasures and tool to help me achieve this goal is the following book “Eric Sloane’s Weather Book” in his fourteen chapters Eric writes in such a way that it makes it easy to understand concepts such as cold and warm fronts, the air masses and about the winds amongst other interesting topics. One particular page I really enjoyed at the beginning of the book is the weather sayings of the old sailors and they are easy to remember but very informative.

I wanted to end this blog entry with a quote that the author also included in his book written by William Shakespeare: “In nature’s infinite book of secrecy a little I can read.”
I hope that in time, I will be able to read and understand some of the pages in nature’s book.

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