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Posts Tagged ‘wildlife’


As a regular “Joe” amongst the millions of hunters from around the world, I know one thing and this is that I am incredibly fortunate to be alive and able to work. With this luxury I can afford to put funds aside so that I can purchase new supplies or tools for our shared passion. But for me this means having to save up over several months, so that I can afford my new tool in my sights and this is the Stoeger M3500. I believe that with the results of my research and experience in the field, it is one of the only shotguns that can handle my punishment in the field.

A few nights ago, I watched a historical documentary about Mountain Men and their adventures in the West. One of the guests on the show was historian Robert Utley, who I loved listening to. He said that for the Mountain Men to be able to survive in the wilderness, they required several sets of qualities, some of these were strength, courage, endurance, fortitude and dexterity of mind and body. Not only is this incredibly insightful but I think these qualities also apply to the modern day outdoorsman/woman and along with wilderness survival skills, I also believe that humility should be part of this package.

Last weekend I took my family to an expensive special event and with the cost of living being very high today, I tapped into my Stoeger fund, now this might put me back a couple of months from my eventual purchase but the memories were simply irreplaceable. In the fall once the leaves begin to turn red again for another waterfowl season, I know that I will have my Stoeger in hand in the wetlands along with my humility along with my memories.

Robert also shared that mountain men had to deal with every manifestation of nature of human and wildlife activity, and this I know we as modern day hunters share this as well.

Have an amazing small game season.

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As a kid growing up in central Africa in the ninety eighties was an experience that changed me for ever. I realize now even as an adult more than thirty years later that it was an absolute privilege to have lived on the periphery of the “Cite” in a row house, which was in an area where the majority of the locals lived. My life experiences were not just limited to living in a large home along the ocean with its extremely high walls or in the confines of the housing compounds owned by oil companies.

This meant going for days without electricity or running water but experiences like these enabled you to grow as a person and appreciate the true meaning of life. I learned the local language in less than a year and soon I was running free for hours into the neighbourhoods and shanty towns bare feet with my brothers. My parents were teachers and my father taught biology at one of the local high schools.

You got it, this meant that during the school year he needed to collect toads for the dissection classes; this was my job. So at a very young age, I would collect an empty can of powdered milk, a rake and a machete, then head out on my adventures to find toads. Now why would you need a rake and machete for that? Well where you found toads there were almost always pit vipers. I knew exactly where to find toads, under rocks or the papyrus or bamboo forests.

I would lean into the brush or flip a rock, if there was a viper, I would pin the snake with the rake and neutralize it with my machete, and then collect the toads. My best friend and I would normally be greeted by a snake hiss. There were all kinds of species of snakes but the most common was the pit viper and their hiss was a warning indeed and I learned to understand their body language. But ultimately it was more than just a sound of the tongue once it had left the Jacobson gland, it was a form of snake communication, “You reach in for the toad and I will bite”.

In the years that followed, upon returning from a weekend jungle trip, my parents had bought my brothers and I, a young crocodile as a pet, it was less than a meter in size. We kept it in the back yard and its temporary residence was a large empty sail boat hull. My brothers and I had best attempted to re-create its natural habitat along with a mud bank and water inside the boat. If we wanted to transport it out, for our friends to see, we would place the rake in the water, and as the crocodile would bite down on the metal part along with a fierce splash of water, and once its jaws had a good grip, we would lift it out of the boat and let it roam around the yard for a few hours.

If our dogs got too close, the crocodile would bend its body bringing its tail around for a strike and soon it would let out the infamous hiss. It was a fascinating pet and as long as you stayed away from its jaws, life was just normal in central Africa. Crocodiles are ordinary reptiles and I soon discovered that the hiss was not just a verbal warning like the pit vipers but also of course a form a communication because it did not always result with the animal clapping it jaws, it simply communicating.

Now this makes for wonderful childhood stories but what does this have to do with small game hunting in north America? Well for the past couple of years now in the spring, we have had two resident Canada geese setup a nest just across the creek from our home in the country and well where do think they feed? On my lawn. As long as they do not get too aggressive, I am fine with having two natural lawn mowers. And just like a coyote if you physically show them you are more dominant through verbal or physical gestures then they leave you alone. I suppose I should write don’t try this at home.

All wildlife adapt to their environments and with my family running around the back yard, this has become their new norm. The Chin Straps stay only lasts a few weeks and once the goslings are old enough they move along… well until the next year. The male’s role is to keep watch and you guessed it, if you get too close, he lets out a hiss, just like the snake and crocodile but the Canada also lets out some deep soft honks from his throat with it bill partially opened.

For the Canada geese, just like communicating with a child, I usually get down on my knees to limit my physical expression as aggression, putting myself at the same level as them and in this case the wild goose and then imitate his soft deep honk and hiss and I have confirmed something once again about this “hiss” it does not always trigger a physical response, it can be interpreted as aggression but a rather a form of warning.

Many outdoorsman/woman are some of the most experienced conservationists and have a deep understanding wildlife behaviour and communication, some without even noticing it, it is just another piece of the puzzle in our sport.

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Day after day, I drive into work and park at the same old spot in the underground parking tucked in right at the back, away from any other vehicles. There is only one other car that shares the back with me and this car is only there every other day. It is a pretty fancy sedan compared to my older truck. So, when it is parked near my spot I have to manoeuvre a little more in order to place myself in a reverse position which makes it easier to get out at the end of the day as well as avoiding a collision.

But this blog entry is not about vehicles or parking. When I drive up to the last turn inside the underground parking in the morning where the other car is usually parked, I have now turned it into a game; can I really try to guess if the car will be there or not? This is also before I can physically see it. Almost like I can predict its presence, but it is after all just a mass of steel and rubber and so far my ability to be able to read the presence of the car without seeing it has turned up empty. And this is most likely because there is no soul or energy coming from the car.

I am a believer that if any hunter is fully immersed in natures elements and that their senses are in perfect tune even the unexplained one’s. I know that we can feel the presence of animal in the woods. On my last snowshoe hare hunt, I knew I was being watched and I had this un-explained feeling within me that I was not alone in the woods and only meters from me was a snowshoe hare in its freeze pose, staring right at me.

Another interesting experience that I had with wildlife in their elements was during a drive home in the winter time, I like to take the country roads on my drive home at night and on this particular evening there was a light snow fall, and on this road at one point there is a very sharp turn but people generally take it pretty fast. For some reason while I was driving up the to the turn, I had a strong feeling in my gut, it was like an instinctive queue to slow down. I let off the gas pedal and just as soon as I did a deer leapt out from the ravine and landed directly in front of my bumper and it turned facing away from me. I tapped the break gently and I slid on the snow and gently bumped it two more times, the deer tried to outrun the truck but slid in the ice below then as soon as it got traction it bounced again and disappeared into the brush.

It was not instinct, I felt the deer and I am a believer that over time I will be able to hone this gift.

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Life has been extremely busy lately and there doesn’t seem to be any sign of it letting off. But I know one thing, and that is, I am extremely grateful for what I have and that I am able to practice our beloved sport. Especially with all that is going on in Texas and now Florida who will soon get hit with this incredibly nasty weather. My thoughts and prayers go to all those affected by the storms and flooding.

After a hectic day sometimes going for a drive is all that you need to clear your head, a remedy in sorts. And with the waterfowl season (Canada Geese -More Info) having just started in farmland in my district on the 6th of this month, what better way to knock out two birds with one stone…no pun intended. So, I stopped by Canadian Tire and purchased my first box of shells for the season.

Before heading to the store I checked out my ammunition boxes and noticed that I still had several Remington #3 shells left over from last season. So, I picked up a box of 12 gauge Remington Hi-Speed Steel, 3 inch in length and #2. It was a very simple purchase but a knowledgable one; the price was right at twenty-one dollars a box and I trust its performance after very successful past seasons. In a few days, I will be pursuing some geese in the fields and shall be using a mixture of #2 and #3 at various ranges. I am very excited about spending some time out in nature and hopefully bring back some birds.

Stay Safe and have a great season!

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The month of October is just a few days old now and the evenings are much cooler, the sun is also setting sooner. Late in the afternoon after work, I sometimes enjoy a nice drive, and with the bright fall colors in bloom, this drive was a real treat.

I chose to visit four of the best duck hunting boat launch sites and was on the lookout for waterfowl activity in preparation for my planned duck hunt in the upcoming days. It is without a doubt beautiful country indeed, each site had their very own long dirt road which cut through farmer fields and wetlands. The swamp grass and weeds were dark green with touches of a golden color and the water was very dark.

The sky was clear of rain but had a violet-blue color to it with bursts of pink which reflected off the clouds as the sun was setting, so I stopped the truck and put it into park, then opened the door and stood up on the truck foot rail and placed my right elbow on the roof. I was wedged at the opening of the driver side door where the door hinges were and then brought up my binoculars to have a better look from the southeast all the way down the river to the southwest.

Within minutes a flock of thirty geese flew right over me and then some ducks and blackbirds flew in along the river from the north-east heading west. An acquaintance of mine who has spent well over forty years in the woods and farming country told me once that if you are hunting and you do not necessarily harvest but you see animals this is a good start.

Once I got my fill of ducks and Canada geese for the night, I turned the truck around and started my way down the dirt road going north and then all of a sudden to the east near the tree line I spotted three very large deer feeding in the open and only forty feet away from them was a group of twenty eastern wild turkey, moving southerly toward the wetlands.

Well it was now time to head for home but not without seeing a little more wildlife, I finished off the drive with a cottontail sitting on the edge of the road. My fall hunting season started just a few weeks ago but these sightings are a sure sign that I am on the right path towards having a great season.

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The first time we drove up to my friend’s hunting camp, we decided to take one truck in order to save on gas. We left late in the afternoon the day before our hunt actually started, so that we could also take advantage of the early rise the following morning.

My friend drove north along the river on its winding roads and as he looked around during our two-hour trip, he had a gift for spotting every deer found along the tree line and in the open fields. Even the ones that were quite far away, as time went on and dusk was nearing, they became more difficult to spot but not for his trained eye.

In North America the majority of us have become so dependent on our grocery stores to provide us with food that we have lost some of these basic skills that I believe are still extremely important.

In Haiti after the massive earthquake struck in 2010; shelter, water and food became some of the most important life saving necessities. In situations like these money was now just paper and what mattered most was getting food.

When disaster strikes or in any emergency situation having basic skills is what saves lives. Basic skills like being able to spot game for means of feeding a family, a group or yourself is critical.

For me today spotting game is just one of the components of a sport that I Love so much but it is a skill that I am constantly trying to improve. Whether it is during hikes with my family or driving along country roads, I am always looking for life.

I have seen deer, wild turkeys, squirrels, coyote, ducks, grouse and geese all from my vehicle during late afternoon or early morning drives. I have spent thousands of hours learning wild game, where and when you are most likely to see them.

Knowing their habits and what to look for, such as various shades of color or their movements and understanding the land, vegetation used for cover or the proximity of water.

Practice makes perfect indeed, once you have studied the right material now comes the time to practice, go for a drive or next time you are out in nature add some flavor to your outing and look for game and ultimately life. The safest practice on the road is to have someone else drive for you, so that you can focus on looking for game.

Many of us have seen wildlife before, sometimes they are in plain sight or in some cases you had to look a little harder. In time you will have mastered the gift of seeing game and it may even become instinctive, you will know exactly what you are looking for and catch it with your eyes even before your mind registers it. Almost every time, almost.

Until then see you!

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In two days, I will be heading back into the woods and I can barely contain my excitement. I will have spent almost the whole week preparing my gear and rifles for the day trip. It is very difficult to describe this strange magnetic draw I feel toward the wilderness.
 
In Dianne Macmillan’s book “Life in a deciduous forest” she writes about energy and how it is transformed into food when it pertains to the relationships between the sun, the North American biome and its ecosystems, which also include wildlife.
 
She describes the different levels of a forest from high above in the canopy down through the understory and finally to the forest floor; there is in fact energy and not just at the solar or nutrient levels. She writes the following on page six: “A constant exchange of matter and energy creates a natural balance.”

It is all it takes just a few hours in the woods and I am able to grasp the balance I need. Although the majority of us live in urban areas, we are very much part of the link and this relationship that the author writes about, futhermore at the end of the book she provides websites and suggestions on activities and practices that are great for the environment.

This blog is not just about small game and varmint hunting but also about conservation, if you leave a room -shut off the light. This simple yet great gesture will indirectly affect your hunting environment in a positive way allowing you and future generations to benefit from the wilderness as well.

I highly recommend this book as it was an enjoyable read, so much so that I finished it in just two hours. The book is extremely informative and helps you better understand life in a deciduous forest and there are some great points about its wildlife such as the black bears, ruffed grouse and other small game.

Education and awareness are key, thank you Dianne!

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