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Posts Tagged ‘wikipedia’


There are hundreds of gun manufacturers throughout the world and the companies that are known to us; either invest a lot of money in their advertising or just simply make fine firearms. Some manufacturers however achieve both these points and much more by producing outstanding firearms, with beautiful designs, and overall great performance.

Browning, Marlin, ArmaLite, Colt, Remington and Savage are just some of the names that may sound familiar to you or you might have used their firearms while out on a hunt or at the shooting range. Personally, I have actively used firearms for well over two decades and some include the names listed above and still I find it difficult to consider myself an expert in this field, because of all the advancements in the industry.

Today, I am an ordinary fellow that really enjoys small game hunting but I also lead a very busy life which includes unexpected expenses and bills. So when considering a new purchase, the cost of a firearm is without a doubt one of key factors that can affect anyone’s decision. Then of course you also have to think about many other points such as the design, its performance in the field, including both federal and provincial regulations/laws with concerns to munitions being used by that particular firearm or the game you are pursuing. Performance points can be identified as the range of the firearm in various conditions or its overall durability and many others.

I have used the Remington 870, my collection of .22’s from Savage and Cooey for various small game and I absolutely enjoy them; now I wanted to add some flare to my hunts and my choice this year was the T-Bolt Composite Target/Varmint in 17 HMR from Browning.

I spent weeks studying the T-bolt and comparing the rifle to similar types made by Marlin and Savage; the Browning may have been more expensive but I liked the fact that the action was a pull-back instead of the bolt-action like the others; which I find makes it easier to stay in a good shooting position without having to move too much to reload another round in the chamber. I also really liked the features of the Double Helix rotary magazine allowing for a reliable reload with its design; you also have a second magazine tucked away in the butt plate for quick access. Although the T-bolt does not have iron or a bead sight this did not matter to me as I plan to put on a scope.

Because I hunt hare, coyote and groundhog the 22 inch heavy varmint profile barrel was the best choice for my hunting scenario. Some manufacturers are better than others, but ultimately they are all legitimately good, if not they would not be able to sell firearms. My advice is to identify your requirements for your hunting scenario and then set out to buy the firearm you really want regardless of the price. If you find yourselves having to save up like I did for a few months and buy quality, then do so. Not only will you benefit from this great firearm but future generations will also.

Here are some examples of hunting scenario choices:

Barrel length and type, for example heavier barrels provide more accurate shots; keep in mind your federal and provincial or state regulations. It is also easier to walk through thick brush with a shorter barrel.

Look and feel or design, this is really a personal preference with concerned to drawings on the stock, having different gunstock types and grips.

Ammunition, again keeping regulations in mind, whether you want to take close or long distance shots and the type of the game you will be hunting will affect your choice. If you look up rifle cartridges in Wikipedia they have a great photo/chart with various rounds listed. Velocity and range also fall under ammunition and the firearm being used.

Carrying capacity, reloading and firing speed; magazines of any kind will facilitate the ease of reloading to ensure you can shoot rapidly in the event that the game is moving quickly in front of you. Magazine designs can affect the types of loading and can help avoid jams or double feeds.

Game types, know which firearms can be used for the type of animal that you are pursuing and then inform yourselves on the type of firearm that is best suited and most efficient for that hunt. Duck hunting is a good example; I would recommend semi-automatic shotguns over pump-action because of the increase in speed it provides when reloading allowing for a quicker release of your 3 shells.

Conduct a lot of research and talk to fellow hunters who have a lot of field experience and also store owners and pro’s.

Be safe.

When you are thinking of buying and you are not quite sure; you may find yourselves doing research on the web which is not a bad thing, but you can easily drown in all the information that is found on discussion or web forums. And besides what are the chances of that person providing you with their opinion ever going on a hunt with you? Heck! They may not even hunt the same type of game as you or may just go to shooting ranges.

Choose wisely & have a great hunt!

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In his book The Life of Birds the author David Attenborough wrote that “Each kind of hunter has its own technique for deploying its weapons.” In the “Meat eaters” chapter he talks about birds of prey and the importance of their vision. My vision is without a doubt one of the first tools that I employ when hunting rabbits or hare. In my previous blog entry I demonstrated my technique in a mini video on how I scan the low ground and hideouts to find snowshoe hare; I then deploy my shotgun if I see one.

Our vision is so important to small game hunters as it is for all forms of hunting. Now unless you are hunting in area where there is a high population density of hare then the task of spotting a hare in the woods becomes that much more of a challenge especially during the winter months. White on White! All predators have binocular vision and I believe that this is one of the most used tools when hunting hare or rabbit. What is binocular vision?

The definition for this type of vision is well described on the Wikipedia website. As a human hunter we simply need to understand the fact that our eyes are placed in the front of the head just like several other predatory species this gives us an advantage to our field of view. This is estimated to be approximately two hundred degrees with the use of both eyes.

However having a large field of view can be considered a disadvantage, this really depends on the situation. For example in my rabbit hunting technique, once I have found a lead, I normally stop and look to the front and allow my peripheral vision try to pickup movement that is not considered normal for the environment that I am in. Trees moving in the wind, snow falling off the branches is natural in the woodlands but black furry tips moving very quickly raises a red flag as do shiny black eyes.

With binocular vision our ability to detect faint objects is enhanced, we have a stronger depth perception. Understanding vergence and stereopsis can help a lot when hunting.

Success in rabbit hunting is being able to spot them before they see or hear you and taking your shot before they attempt to run and hide. This rule also applies to meat-eating Buzzards. Eagles for example have adapted their flight attack pattern for this same very reason, so that rabbits do not scoot away from them before it is too late.

Vision is a very important tool; it would be awesome to have more rods in our retina thus improving the acuity of our vision, especially in low light.

Can you imagine the visual advantages we would have while hunting rabbit if we could see them flick their ears two miles away just like a Buzzard? The challenge then would be to come up with a great technique to close the gap just enough to take a clean shot. So if you can see the rabbit or hare from a distance and are capable of closing the gap with great skill then you may harvest.

Yet even Buzzards must adapt their approach of the attack when coming in for a kill, they cannot just drop down from above or the hare will see them and scoot.

So even with their superior sight they still need to concentrate their efforts into their descent flight gradually adjusting their height and coming down almost to ground level flapping their wings to grab the rabbit with great speed and surprise.

In closing the Buzzards vision is definitely more acute than ours because they have far more rods in their retinas as much as 1000000 in comparison to us 200000/mm2. So even with this visual advantage, they still need to complete the approach for the harvest.

Next time I hit the woodlands, I am going to try a new technique, I will find a lead and mark it with a branch. Then I will place myself off set from the lead about twenty meters away with my binoculars in the prone position and wait to see if the hare’s will move about and attempt to spot one. Watching from far just like a Buzzard. It won’t be my first time lying in the snow but I will make sure there are no coyotes around.

I don’t have the luxury of low-level flying like a Buzzard but being already on the ground I will try to get as low as I possibly can. I want to be able to find, see and close in on the hare and attempt to harvest. If it works I will call it the Buzzard method!

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