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Posts Tagged ‘trying’


My theory and belief about the approach may not always apply to all forms of bird hunting, but it is most definitely linked to all other types of game such as hare, fox, coyote and more so with big game like deer.

So, what do I mean by the approach? We are all aware of the use of stealth; scent free clothing or products of that nature, as well as the necessity of wearing camouflaged clothing. Yes, the way we walk through the wilderness is part of the approach but it is not just about trying hard not to be noticed.

There is much more substance to the approach, more depth if you will and I know that it is not just about your clothing or stalking techniques. In fact, it is almost found at the spiritual level. You might say “Oh! No, he is writing about the warm fuzzy stuff.” Not at all, it is about the state of mind in which the person is in, the sense of awareness and the hunter’s ora.

To me anxiety, nervousness’s, impatience and lack of confidence or faith in your abilities as a hunter will spill like a bad energy beyond the boundaries of your physical being and animals will smell, taste and feel those energies and if detected you might end up spending the entire duration of your hunt without seeing a single living thing.

On the second evening of my duck hunting season, I met up with a veteran hunter and good friend of mine who has been deer hunting for the past three decades. He is what I would consider an elder, the real deal and his presence is about as pure as the province of Quebec can produce.
He shared stories about his youth and how impatient he was as a young hunter sitting in his ambush spot in the woods; he spoke of his frustration that would spill out if a deer did not come by within the first few hours of the day.

His father who was an experienced guide, taught him to shed these negative energies, it was a type of meditation, clearing his mind and imagining the perfect hunt while he was sitting in his ambush site. He would imagine and create the hunt that would unfold in front of him.

He told me that he would raise his arm like a rifle and point his hand toward the opening in the woods or the edge of the field and let his imagination run and more often than not a deer would appear within a few hours and when it was a trophy buck he took his shot and harvested.
I once read a book about a bow hunter that would take the time to sit by the road and leave all the stresses of the city behind and then when he felt ready to hunt, he would get up and off he went.

For me, it starts during the drive to the site; I turn off the radio and try to think about something other than the hunt. Sometimes, at the start of a hunt with my good tracking friend we normally take the tobacco out of a cigarette and do a sort of offering by spreading it around our starting point.

Like I have written about many times, it’s not about having hundreds of trophies in your den, or sharing over exaggerated war stories, it is about keeping the hunt raw and I do not consider a meditation ritual one bit silly.

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Canadian Hunter

I find myself sometimes sitting in my office staring at my computer screen, all the while clients are coming in an out for all types of urgent reasons. It is a mad rush. You do your best to fight the current trying to avoid getting caught up in it all. Yet you are bound by an obligation to provide services faster than the eye can see. You are a small part of this society, which we have labelled with flags and governments all mixed up with history and culture.

Your lavish titles dictate your status in this world which we have ultimately created. It is in a sense an artificial place and we are all desperately trying to make our mark. In order to stay healthy both physically and mentally in this environment, we need a release to maintain a much-needed balance in our lives.

Mine like many others is hunting and not just the harvesting aspect but the whole experience of being in the wilderness. When I am walking through the woods surrounded by trees or in the meadows, my inner battery is being recharged. My hunter friend described the feeling as being more alive when he is in woods. This is so true and it gets me thinking about the concrete jungle that I have left behind.

I stare at the trees, rock cliffs, the snow and the leaves and this is when it all becomes so clear. This is where we came from, it is our roots the birth of our existence and yet in pursuit for advancement we have made ourselves foreign to our very place of origin, the wilderness.

For those who have lost touch with nature, they have broken a critical link to their origins and if exposed to their own original biome they would surely perish due to lack of knowledge either under the claws of predators or the wicked cold of the north.

Hunters guard this relationship with nature every time they step out into the wilderness. This link to our origins is kept alive in a healthy equilibrium by those who hunt; the natives understand this and have been trying to share this message with us for centuries.
I believe the passion in hunting is about living the moment and knowing that you are doing your share in re-enforcing this link to our roots all the while enjoying your sport.

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