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Posts Tagged ‘time’


Only three days left in La Belle province of Quebec and our waterfowl season will begin in my area on farmlands only, for Canada and Cackling Geese. Then on the twenty-second of September it will be open in other areas such as wetlands until practically the end of December for ducks and other species of birds.

I am really hoping for a great season this fall and I consider myself so fortunate to be in good health and surrounded by good friends and fellow waterfowler’s. I am also looking forward to using the spices I purchased at Cabela’s for cooking incredible dishes at home to share with friends and family.

My emotions are running high, as the anticipation for the season boils over, but there is one more instance that has been brewing and this is the simple fact that time has been accelerating. The summer has come and gone and now the waiting is over with the waterfowl season starting in just a few days.

I am not sure if the impression of time acceleration comes with age or is time truly moving faster? Is this related to a higher level of consciousness, this I am not sure but this mystery remains in the spiritual realm.

Well the time has come to end this blog entry and I wish you all a safe and amazing season and I am looking forward to sharing my stories of this years hunts with you.

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Hang on! Before I start typing, let me turn on Kane Brown -Heaven on “Youtube”…ok now I am ready.

Like many outdoorsmen and women out there, I love to watch videos about hunting, my favourite one’s have to be about waterfowl, either from ground blinds or jump shooting from a canoe or kayak.

Not only do I pick up on new tips and tricks but I also really enjoy watching some of the great hunts that have been captured on film, in addition I love having some great laughs, especially when watching “Outlaw” videos on Dippin’ and Huntin’ geese.

It brings back memories of dippin’ with my buds when I was younger, sharing awesome moments.

Many of those videos out there often host a guide or two and their role is vital to a successful hunt with regards to the harvesting of game. I am normally the hunter out there and it has been like this for years and I have also made some great vids too with my GoPro but in the past couple years, I have had several opportunities to be a guide. I always had my doubts about my abilities as a guide but after having taken several buds on successful duck and Canada goose hunts and now this weekend turkey hunting, I am slowly transforming into a seasoned guide.

Knowledge is definitely a large part of being a great guide, but also having the right equipment for example turkey decoys, a tent/blind and a good turkey caller is key, especially for my upcoming weekend. Then there are other attributes like having confidence about your decisions, and having a great understanding of the game that you are pursuing and its environment.

There are many other important factors to being a guide, like having the ability to take responsibility for the mistakes made because in some cases even if it may not always be said, the hunters will lay the blame on you as the guide for their unsuccessful harvests, even if it was mother nature’s doing.

My whole life I have been surrounded by institutions that solely exists based on theories and this just does not work out in the field. Part of being a guide is also earning confidence and trust from the hunters, and this is easily obtained by being modest and having proven field experience, this can be as easy as having great stories based on field time or a simple picture of you with a harvested Turkey or geese in your den.

This will not be my last blog about being a guide because it is simply an intriguing subject and so vast. Until next time remember to be respectful of your guide and keep in mind their proven field experience and learn to trust their instincts.

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I have written about it, I have filmed it and I have lived it a hundred times over, yet I find myself sometimes coming back disappointed that I was unable to capture the true experience of spending a cold December evening with the chin straps along the cold black waters of the river. The reality is that when you live it, you are in a sense writing about it when you think about the words that you will use to describe the whole experience. Your mind is in fact filming it too and transforming it into an incredible memory. But it is an exclusive film that only your eyes capture and sharing through stories I find does not always do it justice.

The sun down time today was at four twenty in the afternoon which meant I could hunt until ten to five. This usually means full darkness at this time of year but with the moon coming up this evening it was simply out of this world and was lighting up the whole river bank toward the West. I wanted to ensure I had a long enough hunt, so for this I left the house at around two in the afternoon, thus giving me enough time to get to my spot and setup. Today I brought along my kayak and rigged up a harness for me to pull it like a sled behind me, at least until I got to the water’s edge. This way I can also retrieve birds that fall in to the water a quite a distance.

The trail is not an easy one to navigate through its waist deep watering holes and large broken ice sheets but I always seem to make it just fine. Once on the river’s edge I paddle up the river heading East for about one kilometer, which is what I did today. There was a strong wind and light snow fall, and the whole experience was magical. The waters were a little choppy but I made sure to stay close to shore, and it did not take long for the river to come to life with a bufflehead which flew with lightning speed down the edge of the river to my right but he was too quick for a side angle shot.

The advantage of having my kayak as well is that there are a few spots where I can almost always harvest some Mallard ducks but you can only access it using a boat, however once on the other side of that bank, you can easily hide amongst the tall swamp grass and sneak up to the ducks for a good shot. Quite often I get down on all fours and move forward through the brush sometimes even placing my bare hands into cold water puddles of ice. But it is well worth the reward.

I have blogged a few times about the golden half an hour before sun rise and after sun down and I can not emphasize enough how amazing those time of days are. If you do your research and observe where the birds fly in and you have a good shot, your chances of a harvest during this time is most definitely greater. This time a year, I find that number 3 and 2 shells are not sufficient and I prefer using BB or triple B, in addition while hiding amongst the tall grass do not move and let the geese come in for a close approach this will sometimes guarantee a harvest.

At around four thirty the geese started to fly in by the hundreds from fields to the South to the safety of the river but remained on the other side, it was a hypnotizing sight much like I have experienced during my snow geese hunts near Quebec city. After a few more minutes passed, small groups of chin straps were now starting to cut across within shooting range and it was simply mind-blowing. The sights and sounds were phenomenal and when I called out a few short calls the geese would drop altitude with the sharp ninety degree bank turn and head right toward my natural blind. I never tire of watching a flock of geese flying into range and each bird taking turns completing a sharp bank turn which allows them to drop altitude faster that is if they are coming in for a potential landing. I have also seen them complete this type of aerobatics if they also fly over tree lines where they know they might get shot at, almost like evasive flight manoeuvres.

It was simply amazing!

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Every year when spring comes upon us, the tributary near our house brings all kinds of life to us in its winding ripples; hooded mergansers, beaver and Canada geese but also a lot of water.

With the snow melt, the water rises rapidly and within just a few days our point is lost to the cold currents, and if I am lucky a few logs are washed up onto the property, which turn out to be great firewood. This year was an exceptional year, and in just one short week we got two days of rain then some snow melted lightning quick, which resulted in even higher water levels.

The grass on the edge of the waterway still has its mix of light and dark brown colours, and of course lots of mud between the snow patches but it makes for good nesting. European Starling, Red wing blackbirds right down to your common house sparrow are eating away, mating and getting their nests ready.

I have a bird feeder on the edge of the property that I keep filled with wild bird food and thanks to the common grackles that are such messy eaters they put some all over the ground. This of course has attracted other critters, such as chipmunks and squirrels.

It has also caught the attention of a pair of Canada geese, I named respectively Charlie and Charlotte. Every morning, I put out the left over bread from our breakfast to my crows. I usually throw the bread out the back door and then call out three times. The crows come flying in from all directions, land out at safe distance, call out back at me and to the other crows and then come in for the bread. If I forget to feed them, they fly over my roof to the front of the house and around our car and call me out.

The geese have watched me feed the crows over a period of two days and then once they have considered me no longer a threat, they decided to come in and enjoy some bread as well. The male would keep watch as the female fed hastily, then they would take turns on watch duty.

After a few days the Canada geese feeding pattern changed again, they would swim up the creek and come up the bank to feed at the bird feeder but this time around seven in the evening just before dark and feed for only a few minutes then disappear back into the dark waters.

One more week has gone by and right on schedule the Canada geese show up on the bank near the feeder right about seven in the evening and feed on the left over seeds and grain.

Yes, if you feed birds they will come and they will get used to you, but there is much more to it, then just feeding. These Canada geese impress me with their impeccable timing, and I know it is not instinct. There is a hidden science to their ability to base habits with time, because at seven in the evening at this time a year there is still a good hour of so of light.

It may be a question of time but I will figure out their understanding of timings.

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Well it was about that time in the morning that I stood with everyone else at the stop waiting for the bus to head into work. Most people were still half asleep, others were glued to their mobile devices; some were smoking or simply talking to the person next to them.

As for me, my eyes were up in the sky looking at the geese flying overhead coming in from the river just south, heading to the fields about two kilometers north for the day to feed. I was listening to their calls, watching them fly over in formation but I also kept an eye on the time.

Hunters can head into farm areas or wetlands and hope to harvest a duck or two all throughout the day but you can definitely increase your chances of having greater success, if you choose the right time of day to hunt.

To the others in my queue at the bus stop, the geese were either part of the fall scenery or simply nuisance birds, but what they do not realize is that these birds were sharing vital information regarding their resting and feeding spots in addition they were also providing the exact time when a waterfowler can maximize his or her chances of having a great harvest.

I have found that the golden minutes at dawn are thirty minutes before sunrise and at dusk they are the half an hour after sundown. The advantage at dawn is that you can continue hunting throughout the morning but at dusk, it is a very small window of time and managing this period is very important to give yourselves the opportunity to set up your blinds and decoy spreads in order to capitalize on the exact time.

There are great tools at your disposal, websites containing the sunrise and sundown information and some GPS models even have it integrated and can provide you with the sunrise and sundown time for your geographical area.

I always carry a head lamp, my gun case and trigger locks with me for the hunts at dusk, so that I can secure my shotgun in accordance with the federal and provincial laws, it is safe and you will also avoid heavy fines.

Have a great time and be safe!

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In his book The Life of Birds the author David Attenborough wrote that “Each kind of hunter has its own technique for deploying its weapons.” In the “Meat eaters” chapter he talks about birds of prey and the importance of their vision. My vision is without a doubt one of the first tools that I employ when hunting rabbits or hare. In my previous blog entry I demonstrated my technique in a mini video on how I scan the low ground and hideouts to find snowshoe hare; I then deploy my shotgun if I see one.

Our vision is so important to small game hunters as it is for all forms of hunting. Now unless you are hunting in area where there is a high population density of hare then the task of spotting a hare in the woods becomes that much more of a challenge especially during the winter months. White on White! All predators have binocular vision and I believe that this is one of the most used tools when hunting hare or rabbit. What is binocular vision?

The definition for this type of vision is well described on the Wikipedia website. As a human hunter we simply need to understand the fact that our eyes are placed in the front of the head just like several other predatory species this gives us an advantage to our field of view. This is estimated to be approximately two hundred degrees with the use of both eyes.

However having a large field of view can be considered a disadvantage, this really depends on the situation. For example in my rabbit hunting technique, once I have found a lead, I normally stop and look to the front and allow my peripheral vision try to pickup movement that is not considered normal for the environment that I am in. Trees moving in the wind, snow falling off the branches is natural in the woodlands but black furry tips moving very quickly raises a red flag as do shiny black eyes.

With binocular vision our ability to detect faint objects is enhanced, we have a stronger depth perception. Understanding vergence and stereopsis can help a lot when hunting.

Success in rabbit hunting is being able to spot them before they see or hear you and taking your shot before they attempt to run and hide. This rule also applies to meat-eating Buzzards. Eagles for example have adapted their flight attack pattern for this same very reason, so that rabbits do not scoot away from them before it is too late.

Vision is a very important tool; it would be awesome to have more rods in our retina thus improving the acuity of our vision, especially in low light.

Can you imagine the visual advantages we would have while hunting rabbit if we could see them flick their ears two miles away just like a Buzzard? The challenge then would be to come up with a great technique to close the gap just enough to take a clean shot. So if you can see the rabbit or hare from a distance and are capable of closing the gap with great skill then you may harvest.

Yet even Buzzards must adapt their approach of the attack when coming in for a kill, they cannot just drop down from above or the hare will see them and scoot.

So even with their superior sight they still need to concentrate their efforts into their descent flight gradually adjusting their height and coming down almost to ground level flapping their wings to grab the rabbit with great speed and surprise.

In closing the Buzzards vision is definitely more acute than ours because they have far more rods in their retinas as much as 1000000 in comparison to us 200000/mm2. So even with this visual advantage, they still need to complete the approach for the harvest.

Next time I hit the woodlands, I am going to try a new technique, I will find a lead and mark it with a branch. Then I will place myself off set from the lead about twenty meters away with my binoculars in the prone position and wait to see if the hare’s will move about and attempt to spot one. Watching from far just like a Buzzard. It won’t be my first time lying in the snow but I will make sure there are no coyotes around.

I don’t have the luxury of low-level flying like a Buzzard but being already on the ground I will try to get as low as I possibly can. I want to be able to find, see and close in on the hare and attempt to harvest. If it works I will call it the Buzzard method!

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