Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘shotguns’


I have written about it, I have filmed it and I have lived it a hundred times over, yet I find myself sometimes coming back disappointed that I was unable to capture the true experience of spending a cold December evening with the chin straps along the cold black waters of the river. The reality is that when you live it, you are in a sense writing about it when you think about the words that you will use to describe the whole experience. Your mind is in fact filming it too and transforming it into an incredible memory. But it is an exclusive film that only your eyes capture and sharing through stories I find does not always do it justice.

The sun down time today was at four twenty in the afternoon which meant I could hunt until ten to five. This usually means full darkness at this time of year but with the moon coming up this evening it was simply out of this world and was lighting up the whole river bank toward the West. I wanted to ensure I had a long enough hunt, so for this I left the house at around two in the afternoon, thus giving me enough time to get to my spot and setup. Today I brought along my kayak and rigged up a harness for me to pull it like a sled behind me, at least until I got to the water’s edge. This way I can also retrieve birds that fall in to the water a quite a distance.

The trail is not an easy one to navigate through its waist deep watering holes and large broken ice sheets but I always seem to make it just fine. Once on the river’s edge I paddle up the river heading East for about one kilometer, which is what I did today. There was a strong wind and light snow fall, and the whole experience was magical. The waters were a little choppy but I made sure to stay close to shore, and it did not take long for the river to come to life with a bufflehead which flew with lightning speed down the edge of the river to my right but he was too quick for a side angle shot.

The advantage of having my kayak as well is that there are a few spots where I can almost always harvest some Mallard ducks but you can only access it using a boat, however once on the other side of that bank, you can easily hide amongst the tall swamp grass and sneak up to the ducks for a good shot. Quite often I get down on all fours and move forward through the brush sometimes even placing my bare hands into cold water puddles of ice. But it is well worth the reward.

I have blogged a few times about the golden half an hour before sun rise and after sun down and I can not emphasize enough how amazing those time of days are. If you do your research and observe where the birds fly in and you have a good shot, your chances of a harvest during this time is most definitely greater. This time a year, I find that number 3 and 2 shells are not sufficient and I prefer using BB or triple B, in addition while hiding amongst the tall grass do not move and let the geese come in for a close approach this will sometimes guarantee a harvest.

At around four thirty the geese started to fly in by the hundreds from fields to the South to the safety of the river but remained on the other side, it was a hypnotizing sight much like I have experienced during my snow geese hunts near Quebec city. After a few more minutes passed, small groups of chin straps were now starting to cut across within shooting range and it was simply mind-blowing. The sights and sounds were phenomenal and when I called out a few short calls the geese would drop altitude with the sharp ninety degree bank turn and head right toward my natural blind. I never tire of watching a flock of geese flying into range and each bird taking turns completing a sharp bank turn which allows them to drop altitude faster that is if they are coming in for a potential landing. I have also seen them complete this type of aerobatics if they also fly over tree lines where they know they might get shot at, almost like evasive flight manoeuvres.

It was simply amazing!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


The cold early morning water was splashing up against the side of the boat, with my left hand tight against my thigh holding the rope which was attached to the canoe being dragged at the back with its guts filled with our decoys and kit bags. The waves were very rough and we were all taking turns keeping an eye on the “V” shaped waves which formed and were slowly tempting the canoe almost caressing it, and then every few waves large amounts of water would almost fill up the canoe, and then the bow would lift up again and the deck plates would collect the crystal like water drops.

The river was filled with darkness and the water was freezing cold, it made you appreciate the comfort of the boat. It was still very dark out and we were moving right along the shore going North West up the river toward our duck hunting spots. The lights all around us were flickering orange, red and yellow surrounded by lush forest and swamps grass. I longed for the warmth of the fireplace and a nice hot drink but the excitement of the hunt was a much more powerful attraction indeed.

It had been raining now for the last two hours and it was slowing turning into a light drizzle. After our thirty minute boat ride, we finally reached the launching spot and the pilot brought the motor almost to a stop in order to coast toward the shore with the underside of the boat slowing down with the help of the thick weeds and tree stumps below the water’s surface. The hunter at the front leaped out into the water and pulled us in using the rope to the font of the boat and then stabilized it by pushing down on the tip of the bow with his two hands.  One at a time we hoped out of the boat and then got our shotguns out of their carrying cases, grabbed some shells and then got kitted up with our backpacks and decoy bags and prepared ourselves for the crossing over land to the embankment where our respective hunt spots had been marked.

There was a serpent shaped trail of tall grass which had been padded down by other hunters to get to the embankment, so two of us pulled the canoe onto the shoreline and slid it along like snow sled on the moist grass. It was hard labor but instead of complaining about the pain in our shoulders and arms, we focused on the prize and thought of the early French fur traders who must have suffered tremendously during similar portages.

An additional twenty minutes had passed and we were all in our shooting positions and now it was time to lay out your shells and prepare your kit for the hunt. I slowly unloaded my decoys from my duffle bag and launched them into the water and tall grass. Once they were in the position, I moved back into the high grass and created a natural blind and placed myself into a comfortable shooting position. I took a few breaths in order to relax and wait for dawn, when the sun just breaks the horizon.

We did not have to wait too long and the teal starting flying in from all directions, they were incredibly fast ducks and some were flying in very low to the water, then circling around and then coming in for a landing. Just like last year’s hunt the birds flew in over top and you could hear the feathers cut through the thin morning air right above you. They were beautiful; I would compare them to fighter jets flying over head in perfect unison.

Just one week before opening day, I watched a duck hunting video produced by Knight & Hale and my focus was to improve my “Call Back” and my “Feeding” calls based on their recommendations; and it worked like a charm, the ducks came in low, reacting to my calls and then as one of them came in low to touch down near my decoys I instinctively fired a Remington #3 steal shot into the air with a slight lead and harvested my first teal of the season. It was a brilliant hunt, they are fast birds indeed. Teal’s the Deal on opening day!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: