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Posts Tagged ‘rain’


Last Sunday, I went out to the farm on the lookout for groundhogs and rock doves, but there was no such activity; however there were quite a few black birds. Upon my arrival, I stood in the mud facing the southern fields looking over the partially flooded areas from recent the snow melts and showers.

It was a very windy day and the rain which was predicted by the weather network had turned into a mist, and the sun was also much stronger early in the afternoon bringing up the overall temperature.

I was hidden between a hay bale and a cattle wagon, the fields to my front and sides combined made the shape of the letter “T”. Separated by a creek and mixed trees, I had a very clear view of the southern part. Several minutes had passed and I could now hear a flock Canada geese calling out, short but numerous confident calls, every bird in the flock were calling out; in this first wave I counted fifteen geese.

They flew in from the northwest and flew in around my front to the south and landed in the field to the east, they had cupped their wings and ended up all facing the flooded area in the adjacent field. They were strategically placed in the high ground allowing them to see the flooded area over the tree tops.

Within seconds a second wave of four geese flew in calling out with the same sharp shortened calls and completing a full circle scan of the fields and headed straight down on the flooded area.

Then a third wave of two geese cupped their wings and dove sharply then landed right next to the second wave, beating their wings aggressively seconds before setting foot, slowing them right down for a smooth landing.

It was fascinating to watch, because when the first wave had seen the second and third waves land and some of them had already started swimming in the shallow waters with a couple of mallard ducks.

The first wave immediately called out with the long goose calls which we are all familiar with, then they lifted off, completing a full circle over the three fields and ended up right near the flooded area for their final approach for the landing. Bring all three waves together in the same area.

Now many of us have seen Canada geese fly in for a landing, and it is a beautiful thing to watch unfolding but the majority of us might not put that much more thought into what had actually occurred in front of us.

Observation is an incredible tool during the off-season, and it is the small details that can help improve your hunts.

The geese were constantly communicating with one an other, if at anytime danger presented itself, all the birds would be alerted and would take flight immediately.

Some of the geese once on the ground had already stretched out their heads and were keeping watch for the rest of the birds. Also these Canada’s came in three groups; each wave doing its own aerial scan of the ground below prior to landing and the first wave in particular landed in the adjacent field to the east using the high ground to watch for danger even before second and third wave had landed.

So, if you are a still hunter or even hunting from a blind, you do not want to be caught moving around right away because although some birds may have landed there is a good chance there are others.

Listen to the calls and watch their body language, if the Canada geese start swimming around or laying down in the ground, they are starting to get more relaxed or trying to get warm or now shifting their focus on rest and feeding. If you can identify the birds on watch thus avoiding them if possible and you get closer for your shot, then a time like this would be best. This way if they burst into the flight, they will not be as far and as high allowing for straight and effective shots.

With practice you will be able to interpret their calls by the length, type and by the loudness of it whether or not they have detected your presence.

Observe, listen and take notes, soon enough you will start seeing patterns which will benefit your approach and hunts.

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The cold early morning water was splashing up against the side of the boat, with my left hand tight against my thigh holding the rope which was attached to the canoe being dragged at the back with its guts filled with our decoys and kit bags. The waves were very rough and we were all taking turns keeping an eye on the “V” shaped waves which formed and were slowly tempting the canoe almost caressing it, and then every few waves large amounts of water would almost fill up the canoe, and then the bow would lift up again and the deck plates would collect the crystal like water drops.

The river was filled with darkness and the water was freezing cold, it made you appreciate the comfort of the boat. It was still very dark out and we were moving right along the shore going North West up the river toward our duck hunting spots. The lights all around us were flickering orange, red and yellow surrounded by lush forest and swamps grass. I longed for the warmth of the fireplace and a nice hot drink but the excitement of the hunt was a much more powerful attraction indeed.

It had been raining now for the last two hours and it was slowing turning into a light drizzle. After our thirty minute boat ride, we finally reached the launching spot and the pilot brought the motor almost to a stop in order to coast toward the shore with the underside of the boat slowing down with the help of the thick weeds and tree stumps below the water’s surface. The hunter at the front leaped out into the water and pulled us in using the rope to the font of the boat and then stabilized it by pushing down on the tip of the bow with his two hands.  One at a time we hoped out of the boat and then got our shotguns out of their carrying cases, grabbed some shells and then got kitted up with our backpacks and decoy bags and prepared ourselves for the crossing over land to the embankment where our respective hunt spots had been marked.

There was a serpent shaped trail of tall grass which had been padded down by other hunters to get to the embankment, so two of us pulled the canoe onto the shoreline and slid it along like snow sled on the moist grass. It was hard labor but instead of complaining about the pain in our shoulders and arms, we focused on the prize and thought of the early French fur traders who must have suffered tremendously during similar portages.

An additional twenty minutes had passed and we were all in our shooting positions and now it was time to lay out your shells and prepare your kit for the hunt. I slowly unloaded my decoys from my duffle bag and launched them into the water and tall grass. Once they were in the position, I moved back into the high grass and created a natural blind and placed myself into a comfortable shooting position. I took a few breaths in order to relax and wait for dawn, when the sun just breaks the horizon.

We did not have to wait too long and the teal starting flying in from all directions, they were incredibly fast ducks and some were flying in very low to the water, then circling around and then coming in for a landing. Just like last year’s hunt the birds flew in over top and you could hear the feathers cut through the thin morning air right above you. They were beautiful; I would compare them to fighter jets flying over head in perfect unison.

Just one week before opening day, I watched a duck hunting video produced by Knight & Hale and my focus was to improve my “Call Back” and my “Feeding” calls based on their recommendations; and it worked like a charm, the ducks came in low, reacting to my calls and then as one of them came in low to touch down near my decoys I instinctively fired a Remington #3 steal shot into the air with a slight lead and harvested my first teal of the season. It was a brilliant hunt, they are fast birds indeed. Teal’s the Deal on opening day!

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Whether you are in an elevator filled with strangers or waiting in line at Tim Horton’s coffee shop, one of the easiest ice breakers to get rid of that dreaded silence is to talk about the weather, especially here in Canada.

The weather is not only a social rescue tool but I also consider it to be one of the most important elements no pun intended in which we need to have some understanding and also take into consideration during the preparatory phase of your hunt and during the outing.

There is no need to become a meteorologist in order to have a more successful hunt but if you possess some of their knowledge, it can definitely enhance your chances of success. For example understanding how the weather impacts specific birds can be advantageous during a duck hunt, thinning air is harder to fly in. Birds sit it out before a storm. The skill of being able to interpret the warm and cold fronts is also very important during migratory bird hunting.

I always consult the Weather Network web site the night before my outing, thus allowing me to pack the right gear and to dress accordingly, so that I may hunt comfortably in any time of year.

I am always trying to learn more about the weather, so that I may be better prepared while out on a hunt, thus trying to improve my chances of a harvest but also to be prepared in the event that the weather changes. Knowing which birds or mammals is affected by the weather and how I may use this to my advantage.

One of my greatest treasures and tool to help me achieve this goal is the following book “Eric Sloane’s Weather Book” in his fourteen chapters Eric writes in such a way that it makes it easy to understand concepts such as cold and warm fronts, the air masses and about the winds amongst other interesting topics. One particular page I really enjoyed at the beginning of the book is the weather sayings of the old sailors and they are easy to remember but very informative.

I wanted to end this blog entry with a quote that the author also included in his book written by William Shakespeare: “In nature’s infinite book of secrecy a little I can read.”
I hope that in time, I will be able to read and understand some of the pages in nature’s book.

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