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Posts Tagged ‘philosophy’


2 Hounds and Bear

I wanted to thank the author Olaus J. Murie and everyone who assisted him in producing this great book from the “Peterson Field Guide Series” on animal tracks. It has now joined the rest of the books I have read on my OKB page, which I consider to be a digital treasure shelf.

I also wanted to include a quote that Olaus put in his book by Henry David Thoreau: “If I were to make a study of the tracks of animals and represent them by plates, I should conclude with the tracks of man.” Now I am pretty sure what he meant as a philosopher, was indeed his interpretation of the evolution of man. I wanted to share this quote from the book because as a tracker it is important to have an open mind, add some flavor of philosophy and abstract thinking to your skill.

Tracks are signs of life and confirm the presence of a species in its respective geographic area, basically its habitat. Animal tracks ignite a curiosity in all of us, and as a hunter it does for me even if it means that sometimes I may not harvest even though I have found a set of tracks. It is the joys of constant learning!

Droppings, tracks, scrapping on trees, small nibbling off a bush all tell a story. My belief is that a good tracker can piece together clues and then interpret actual events and if you are also a good hunter ultimately you could potentially find the game that you are pursuing.

So when hunters type the following key words in a search engine “Small Game Tracks” what is it they are looking for? Technical information or the philosophy behind tracking? If this question can be answered but also be understood, then they may start the hunt following animal tracks and conclude the hunt with the tracks of man.

Check out my Photo Gallery page for my growing collection of animal tracks and droppings.

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Canadian Hunter

I find myself sometimes sitting in my office staring at my computer screen, all the while clients are coming in an out for all types of urgent reasons. It is a mad rush. You do your best to fight the current trying to avoid getting caught up in it all. Yet you are bound by an obligation to provide services faster than the eye can see. You are a small part of this society, which we have labelled with flags and governments all mixed up with history and culture.

Your lavish titles dictate your status in this world which we have ultimately created. It is in a sense an artificial place and we are all desperately trying to make our mark. In order to stay healthy both physically and mentally in this environment, we need a release to maintain a much-needed balance in our lives.

Mine like many others is hunting and not just the harvesting aspect but the whole experience of being in the wilderness. When I am walking through the woods surrounded by trees or in the meadows, my inner battery is being recharged. My hunter friend described the feeling as being more alive when he is in woods. This is so true and it gets me thinking about the concrete jungle that I have left behind.

I stare at the trees, rock cliffs, the snow and the leaves and this is when it all becomes so clear. This is where we came from, it is our roots the birth of our existence and yet in pursuit for advancement we have made ourselves foreign to our very place of origin, the wilderness.

For those who have lost touch with nature, they have broken a critical link to their origins and if exposed to their own original biome they would surely perish due to lack of knowledge either under the claws of predators or the wicked cold of the north.

Hunters guard this relationship with nature every time they step out into the wilderness. This link to our origins is kept alive in a healthy equilibrium by those who hunt; the natives understand this and have been trying to share this message with us for centuries.
I believe the passion in hunting is about living the moment and knowing that you are doing your share in re-enforcing this link to our roots all the while enjoying your sport.

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