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Posts Tagged ‘october’


A young man, who was born during the winter months, once told me that his favorite time of year was the winter. I remember smiling and acknowledged that it was indeed a beautiful time of year but like many hunters, in my mind I didn’t just picture the months in the calendar for that particular time of year but I also identified the hunting seasons.

Everyone loves the summer months that’s for sure, especially after the long winter we had this year, but I ask myself is it possible that people who are born in a particular season, do they have this natural connection to that period of time?

Don’t get me wrong, I really appreciate the hot weather in July and August but I just adore the fall, with its cool air and incredible odors, and I will let you in on a secret, I was born in the fall. For me without a doubt September and October are one of the most incredible months of the year and not just for its colors and weather, these two months are the soul of waterfowl hunting.

I have spent a good two weeks getting my kayak rigged up with camouflage and other kit using Velcro readying for the upcoming waterfowl season and even though I am truly enjoying the sun about as much as a groundhog who is sunbathing. I feel like a bull in a rodeo cage waiting to be released, I just know that it is going to be an incredible duck and goose season this year, I can smell it in the air.

On that note have a great rest of the summer!

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I was sitting dead still in the wilderness, which enveloped me with its bright autumn colors like flames from a fire. The snowflakes were falling onto my jacket sleeve making a faint “tock” “tock” sound then it would disappear, and then run off into its water form down the crease. It was cold, windy and the snowfall was becoming heavier. The forest was so alive and for my ten hours that I spent in this environment, I was in my element and part of something so familiar. 
 
The leaves and small branches to my left were being rustled by a red squirrel, as it skipped in and out of the foliage, then along a fallen tree. He was so nervy, he would stop and then jump up on its hind legs look around and then let out a short cheep and then sprint on.
 
He would disappear into the autumn leaves and then reappear a few feet away, let out the sound of a short thump and cheep and then again he would sprint. My leg was cramping up and I had to move in order to get into a more comfortable position and this set “Red” off, he raised his tail and let out a long cheep and thump every time he would raise his tail, followed by another long high-pitched cheep. It made me feel like a kid who was caught with his hand in the cookie jar and so I promptly whispered “Go away you bugger you will let the other animals know that I am here!” 

If you are able to still hunt without setting off “Red” in the bush then you are truly a master and I applaud you. It does not mean that he or she is necessary pointing you out, it could be another squirrel or small rodent trespassing or a larger animal like a mink. My eyes were wide open and I was scanning in all directions and adjusting my head to see, I was also investigating every sound, broken branch or leaves blowing in the wind.

This is when I spotted him, he came from behind me and cut across the trail and then he too disappeared under the leaves and then sprinted across the forest floor onto a fallen log. I was sitting right on the edge of the swamp on a slope shaped like the letter “u” with the northern and southern sides being the high ground. The mink was scouting for food and he was moving right for the water, he was lightning fast and made it to the swamp and began to swim very quickly in search of food.

I took out my mini binoculars and followed him around for a while; it was such a neat sight until he got too close to “Red”. The American mink is much larger than its European cousin and the red squirrel had no chance, he made a lot of chuckle and cheeping sounds then performed quite a dance around a smaller tree scratching the bark but the mink just faced him and then moved to the south of “Red’s” position, and disappeared into the woods.

It seems as though nature took its course and “Red” was not going to be his next meal or fight but the hierarchical order had been re-enforced. The mink was the dominant one and although he does feed on small mammals and rodents “Red” was not meant to be dead.

As for me my hunt continued until dusk.

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