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Posts Tagged ‘manure’


The sun was high in the sky and it was simply a beautiful drive out to the farm with only a slight breeze coming in from the West. The truck slowly made its way up the dirt road like it has a hundred times. During the spring time though I had to carefully manoeuvre the steering wheel, so that the tires did not veer off forcing the truck into the mud fields to the East. The pre-existing tire tracks had two miniature creeks developing right down the middle of each one from the melting snow, this made it a delicate drive. At the main gate of the farm, the electric fence had already been opened, making it a little easier to get to my favorite parking spot.

This was also indicative that the cows were out in the field and not sitting around the main barn, this was positive. When I get to the farm, I always like to know the cattle whereabouts because they can impact the choice of a shot or not, especially when hunting rock dove. Too close is a no go for a shot.

Rock doves can fly in and adjust their flight path to their entry spot into the landing zone. They are always checking for potential danger and maneuvering accordingly. For example if I am standing by the main gate with my orange hunting vest and they spot me, they will circle in from the North and come in from the forest edge using the cover to mask their approach for the landing. Rock doves can fly in straight overhead or often circle in from either side from where you are standing completing wide arcs.

I like to try to harvest them while high in flight or when they are really close to the ground. About an hour had passed since I got to the farm and I was already walking along the edge of the forest when I came upon an old kitchen chair. I fixed the back rest placed it near a large tree and sat down for a few minutes. It was heavenly and I was taking in the view of the valley and low ground of the farm and also watching the cattle graze. When you take the time to observe cattle, you realize how remarkable they truly are as animals.

While sitting and looking out a thought crossed my mind. I told myself, I just have to be patient and maybe the rock doves will come back as they had flown away while I was sneaking through the woods earlier. Speaking from experience, it is more challenging for a young hunter to stalk the pigeons and take shots for a harvest, but it can also be done using patience and concealment, just sitting and waiting. Very similar to duck hunting, you can walk and flush them or you can set up and sit by the edge of the swamp and the ducks will eventually fly in and offer a shot. Sure enough two rock doves came in, looped around over head and I just sat very still and waited.

Once they circled directly in front of me to the south, I waited for the first one to come within two feet of the ground and I released my shot. He fell into the mud and small feathers floated into the air at the point of impact. I was pleased with my first harvest of the day and was anxious to go pick him up. I cleared my Remington 870, stood up and made my way toward my harvest, I carefully stepped over the electric fence which was just about waist high and climbed over. I walked for about another four meters and all of a sudden my boots hit a slippery spot and up I went. It all happened lightning quick. I was in a horizontal position almost still in the air with my back facing the ground and then I came down hard and landed on my full right hand side.

I was completely soaked in a soup of mud, urine, water, cow manure and hay. I could not believe it, this was my first fall in a long time and I was drenched in cow soup. After a good loud laugh and a quick check over for injuries, I got up and just like a cow getting a good scratch on the barn walls, I walked along one of the old barns and rubbed the gunk off my clothing as best I could.

I had my first harvest alright for the day but I also had a manure filled soup to go with it!

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Whether I am at my friend’s farm or in the woods, hunting small game causes me to walk, crawl, climb, kneel, sit, jump and run. This means sometimes doing all these movements in the mud, manure, snow, water, grass, hay and in the woods.

So what about the right bottoms? And I don’t mean underwear, but rather the right trousers. When I am hunting, here are some of the things I look for in my hunting pants.

Comfort, my pants cannot be too tight thus restricting my movement but I also do not want them to be too loose avoiding pant leg rubbing and making noise. When I buy my hunting pants, I try them on and walk around the store and do all the movements I would be doing in the field. I also look for the tightness around the crotch and thighs.

Camouflage, depending on the time of year and the type of game you are hunting concealment can be important but I do not consider it essential.  If you are hunting birds, then camouflage is needed because they have great sight in color but I have successfully harvested woodchucks from only a few feet away wearing blue jeans.

Pockets, I always carry my hunting cards and some form of identification on me in my wallet as well as my car, trigger lock and ammunition box keys. I find good deep pockets with zippers work best for me. Some hunting pants have cargo pockets along the side of each thigh on the pant leg, and this is great for carrying spare shells or small accessories.

Weatherproofing, when I am hunting during the wintertime, I like hunting with pants that are waterproof and windproof yet that allow your body to breathe and keep you dry. I also want my pants to be loose enough so that I can wear thermal clothing underneath providing extra layers and warmth.
During the summer months, at the farm I normally just wear loose-fitting comfortable jeans but when hunting in the woods, I wear lighter camouflage pattern hunting pants with no insulation layer. You can get a pair of old army pants from a surplus store.

Practicality and durability, I love hunting pants that have zippers down the sides just below the knees, this makes it easier to get dressed and undressed as well as placing your pants over top you’re hunting boots.  I also use pants that are tear proof and potentially have added padding on the buttocks and knees.
Stores such as Wal-Mart, Canadian Tire, your local hunting store or any outdoor superstore such as SAIL, or LE Barons, Gander Mountain all have a great selection of pants with prices ranging from sixty dollars to a couple hundred dollars. Of course there is the Internet too.

Here are some tricks I use with my pants:

Once I have purchased a pair of hunting pants I like to wear them in, using the pair during hiking trips with my family. I wash them a couple of times with scent killer soap or forest odour soaps and let them hang dry without the use softer of any kind. I also spray my pants every time I go out hunting along with my boots with scent killer products.

While walking through the woods if I get warm, I pull down my zipper to allow air flow for cooling but I avoid red, white or bright blue underwear. I would not want that spot to be mistaken for a Spruce Grouse or Wild Turkey by another hunter.

I sometimes use scent free Vaseline and place some on the inside of my thighs and crouch to avoid chafing, this also works on feet to avoid blisters. Just a light coat is needed.
After a hunting trip, I do not wash my pants but I place them in a container that holds the smell of the woods. Once the odours of sweat get too strong then I wash them again with special soaps and start the cycle again.

Happy Hunting and knock your pants off!

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