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Posts Tagged ‘geese’


Hang on! Before I start typing, let me turn on Kane Brown -Heaven on “Youtube”…ok now I am ready.

Like many outdoorsmen and women out there, I love to watch videos about hunting, my favourite one’s have to be about waterfowl, either from ground blinds or jump shooting from a canoe or kayak.

Not only do I pick up on new tips and tricks but I also really enjoy watching some of the great hunts that have been captured on film, in addition I love having some great laughs, especially when watching “Outlaw” videos on Dippin’ and Huntin’ geese.

It brings back memories of dippin’ with my buds when I was younger, sharing awesome moments.

Many of those videos out there often host a guide or two and their role is vital to a successful hunt with regards to the harvesting of game. I am normally the hunter out there and it has been like this for years and I have also made some great vids too with my GoPro but in the past couple years, I have had several opportunities to be a guide. I always had my doubts about my abilities as a guide but after having taken several buds on successful duck and Canada goose hunts and now this weekend turkey hunting, I am slowly transforming into a seasoned guide.

Knowledge is definitely a large part of being a great guide, but also having the right equipment for example turkey decoys, a tent/blind and a good turkey caller is key, especially for my upcoming weekend. Then there are other attributes like having confidence about your decisions, and having a great understanding of the game that you are pursuing and its environment.

There are many other important factors to being a guide, like having the ability to take responsibility for the mistakes made because in some cases even if it may not always be said, the hunters will lay the blame on you as the guide for their unsuccessful harvests, even if it was mother nature’s doing.

My whole life I have been surrounded by institutions that solely exists based on theories and this just does not work out in the field. Part of being a guide is also earning confidence and trust from the hunters, and this is easily obtained by being modest and having proven field experience, this can be as easy as having great stories based on field time or a simple picture of you with a harvested Turkey or geese in your den.

This will not be my last blog about being a guide because it is simply an intriguing subject and so vast. Until next time remember to be respectful of your guide and keep in mind their proven field experience and learn to trust their instincts.

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There is no better way to treat your soul than spending time in the woods, it is not only refreshing but it also allows you to recharge your inner battery. You are free of all the city madness and its sounds. With the snow melt now in effect, and the sun coming out in full strength I couldn’t have asked for a better day to spend time in the elements.

I decided to bring a friend along and we were going to try our luck with rock dove and woodchuck, since their seasons are open all year round in my hunting zone in Quebec. The rock doves are incredible flyers and can perform amazing aerobatics in the air and sometimes can avoid shots thus making it a true challenge, pigeons also learn quickly and recognize danger and can fly away without offering a chance of a harvest.

After a couple failed attempts on the rock doves, I chose to give them a few minutes to calm down and swing back into our wooded area, so we set off to the other side of the creek and head south to try my luck at the woodchucks in the rock formations atop of a hill. The creek current was faster than usual with the water icy cold as there were still ice and snow chunks floating down along with a few Mallard ducks and three Canada geese.

The creek was too wide and we only had our hip waders on, and the depth of the creek was too deep. There were no boards available to make a makeshift crossing, but nature has a way of providing. And in our case it was a land bridge, made by one of the most impressive builders in the animal world, a beaver.

The dam is about eighty meters long and makes for a great land bridge, and it was only six hundred meters West of our current spot, the tricky part was getting there because the bush was extremely thick. I used this opportunity to share my knowledge of moving through the brush, looking for directional signs, such as the position of the sun and the vegetation, for example such as broken twigs, and on our way back we located our foot steps in the mud and snow as guidance.

The forest floor was saturated with snow and mud; sometimes you found yourself sinking into mud holes that resembled quick sand, holding on small trees and walking on the mud islands and downed trees worked great. Also early in the spring, if you are planning on following a creek I tend not to get too close to the edge as the ice sheets overlap the river and if you are not careful, there is nothing but water below the sheets of ice, that have become thinner with the increased temperatures in the spring.

It is a great idea to use a tall walking stick for balance, while crossing the dam wall and ensure that every step is on solid parts of the dam, being aware of the spillway. Once we had reached the other side it was simply magical, just the wind and birds keeping us company. The view overlooking the ridge was just breath-taking. Total mastery of the woodlands is not just a positive feeling but it is also incredibly rewarding. Their dams are not a barrier, but rather a passage.

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I have written about it, I have filmed it and I have lived it a hundred times over, yet I find myself sometimes coming back disappointed that I was unable to capture the true experience of spending a cold December evening with the chin straps along the cold black waters of the river. The reality is that when you live it, you are in a sense writing about it when you think about the words that you will use to describe the whole experience. Your mind is in fact filming it too and transforming it into an incredible memory. But it is an exclusive film that only your eyes capture and sharing through stories I find does not always do it justice.

The sun down time today was at four twenty in the afternoon which meant I could hunt until ten to five. This usually means full darkness at this time of year but with the moon coming up this evening it was simply out of this world and was lighting up the whole river bank toward the West. I wanted to ensure I had a long enough hunt, so for this I left the house at around two in the afternoon, thus giving me enough time to get to my spot and setup. Today I brought along my kayak and rigged up a harness for me to pull it like a sled behind me, at least until I got to the water’s edge. This way I can also retrieve birds that fall in to the water a quite a distance.

The trail is not an easy one to navigate through its waist deep watering holes and large broken ice sheets but I always seem to make it just fine. Once on the river’s edge I paddle up the river heading East for about one kilometer, which is what I did today. There was a strong wind and light snow fall, and the whole experience was magical. The waters were a little choppy but I made sure to stay close to shore, and it did not take long for the river to come to life with a bufflehead which flew with lightning speed down the edge of the river to my right but he was too quick for a side angle shot.

The advantage of having my kayak as well is that there are a few spots where I can almost always harvest some Mallard ducks but you can only access it using a boat, however once on the other side of that bank, you can easily hide amongst the tall swamp grass and sneak up to the ducks for a good shot. Quite often I get down on all fours and move forward through the brush sometimes even placing my bare hands into cold water puddles of ice. But it is well worth the reward.

I have blogged a few times about the golden half an hour before sun rise and after sun down and I can not emphasize enough how amazing those time of days are. If you do your research and observe where the birds fly in and you have a good shot, your chances of a harvest during this time is most definitely greater. This time a year, I find that number 3 and 2 shells are not sufficient and I prefer using BB or triple B, in addition while hiding amongst the tall grass do not move and let the geese come in for a close approach this will sometimes guarantee a harvest.

At around four thirty the geese started to fly in by the hundreds from fields to the South to the safety of the river but remained on the other side, it was a hypnotizing sight much like I have experienced during my snow geese hunts near Quebec city. After a few more minutes passed, small groups of chin straps were now starting to cut across within shooting range and it was simply mind-blowing. The sights and sounds were phenomenal and when I called out a few short calls the geese would drop altitude with the sharp ninety degree bank turn and head right toward my natural blind. I never tire of watching a flock of geese flying into range and each bird taking turns completing a sharp bank turn which allows them to drop altitude faster that is if they are coming in for a potential landing. I have also seen them complete this type of aerobatics if they also fly over tree lines where they know they might get shot at, almost like evasive flight manoeuvres.

It was simply amazing!

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During my migratory bird season, when the Canada geese usually fly in toward the farm where I hunt, more specifically the South side, they quite often choose the two best spots in that area. Either they land across the creek on the edge of the ridge at the start of the hay-field or they land on the North side just shy of the tree line close to the creek.

Both positions offer a great view of the surrounding open ground, which enables the spotter geese to identify a threat and call out if danger is approaching. But it is also near the creek and the swamp which is in the back toward the South-West. In addition there is plenty of food.

It is not by coincidence that they select these two preferred spots and this is why is pays off to be observant. As a waterfowl hunter once you have chosen your approach plan, you can use this knowledge to your advantage and adapt to get close enough to your birds for a harvest.

In my last post, I mentioned that I like to change some things during my hunts to see what works and what doesn’t, this also includes changing my plan of approach during my still-hunts. Just like the geese, I too have a preferred path which I use to close the gap between the geese and I when I stalk them and this is always done on my knees or leopard crawling.

On this particular hunt, I noticed that only six geese came in and flared their wings and landed near the creek facing north. I decided that coming in from the East would be very challenging, having noticed where the spotter geese were standing. So, I changed up my approach plan and worked my way in from the West completing the top part of my approach heading down a ridge and coming up from the opposite side of my usual approach path.

There I lined myself up with an old barn that I used to cover in order to gain more ground. From a bird’s-eye view try to picture a perfect slice of pie superimposed over the field and the tip being where the geese are located, by this time I had now traced the outline of the triangular slice and was coming up the one of the side legs of the triangle heading toward the tip.

The only problem was that now there was nothing but open ground and still several meters to the geese. Once I reached the corner of the barn, I looked through the board gaps and studied the geese position and the spotter geese and decided that coming from the Eastern side would be best. So, I looked to the ground and took several breaths, took three shells and slid them in the buttstock holder and placed the rest in my right pocket and buttoned it shut.

I lowered my face mask then got down on my belly and started to crawl forward toward the East. The first few meters were extremely tough and it was incredibly warm, also making my way over a log. Every few meters, I would stop and place my face into the ground and breathe in a rhythm to control my breathing and not allow myself to get too exhausted.

Once in a while I would slowly lift my head about five inches and check my alignment to ensure I was still in line with the birds. The farm field is full of uneven ground which is perfect to slip into a small trench and gain more ground. On my final approach, I was only pushing with the ball of my feet to propel myself forward and then using my elbows to lift my body of the ground and push ahead.

I was able to get within twenty-five meters of the birds and slide in behind an old upside down claw foot bath tub, which was most likely used to for the cattle to drink a long time ago. I loaded my three shells and pumped the action and placed the 870 on safe. Now I had to figure out how to get to my knees without getting too high and giving away my position. After a couple of minutes, I raised my barrel and rested it on the tub and aligned myself for the first shot.

It did not take long for the birds to call out and burst into the air and with just inches from the ground, I released my shot into the closest goose and it tumbled to the ground with a broken wing. I had to release a second shot into the same bird and while pumping the action to release the second shell and load the third, the spent shell jammed before I could clear it for the third shot and possibly another harvest. It was too late and the others had already set considerable distance between them and I. Quite often with my Remington 870 even if cleaned and pumping the action properly, I find that the shorter shells extract better with my pump-action; one day I hope to be able purchase the new Versa max. This will for sure eliminate the expended shell jams and with the semi-auto action I might be able to release my shots quicker and possibly harvest two or three geese in one single approach.

Just the same I was extremely satisfied with this harvest and the approach. It can be said that in a blind setup, one can harvest a greater number of birds yet I find that still-hunting is so much more rewarding and so far it has proven to be a very positive start of the season with this feathered fox.

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My plan was to get to my friends farm early enough in the morning, just before the geese fly and land into the farmland to feed for the day. When I left the house, I had loaded up all my kit into the truck and I was just glowing. I was ready for my outing. I hadn’t even gone up the road past the local Tim-Horton coffee shop and I was already feeling like I had just won the lottery, and this was without a harvest yet.

I have been driving these road for several years now and I know every bend in the road and do not miss any of its fine details; my truck was slipping in an out of the dips in the road like a soft sheet floating in the breeze. It is in times like these when you learn to let go of the weights of every day stress as you head deeper into the country side. An hour or so had gone by and I was now nearing my destination. About a kilometer out, I had noticed about twenty Canada geese in the neighbouring fields but none in the area where I was going to be, yet I did not let this discourage me and continued on.

I like to try different techniques and tricks during my hunts, so that the experience is never the same and I learn what works and what doesn’t. On this particular day I was going to use my goose caller and call a heck of a lot and see if I would trigger something or attract geese. After having rolled up the dirt road and jumped out of the truck, I noticed four rock doves fly in and land in the low ground to the North-West right near the tree line on the right about three hundred meters out. Without any geese the in the farmland, I decided to set off toward the pigeons and attempt to harvest one of two before the geese flew in, I had to circle around coming in from the East just a few meters in from the tree line, the problem was with all the rain we had this summer, my hip waders were getting stuck in the mud and making a suction sound every time I freed myself from the mud.

I did not want to trigger and alarm the birds and send them into flight, it was hard work and I was breathing heavy by the time I got within shooting range. The doves were higher than me on a ridge and it was not a safe shot, I had to wait for them to come down lower and close the gap between them and I. They would feed and zig zag in an out of the thorn bushes and then fly around nervously and land only meters from where they took off, if you can successfully stalk rock doves in farmland, then you have what it takes to sneak up to Canada geese in an open field.

I now had a clear shot on the first pigeon and was only seconds from taking my shot, when all of sudden the time had come, I heard goose calls coming in from the tree tops and then they flew right over my position headed directly south past the creek and then landed in the southern field on top of its ridge. Their honk calls were short and repeated quickly in repetition, with their feet out and floating down to earth with the inward curved wing formation, it was a beautiful sight. I quickly, unloaded my two fast steel shells, placed my Remington on safe, sprung up and started to sprint in the direction of the geese. This sent the pigeons into flight and they quickly flew off over the forest heading east to the neighbours farm, we would meet again but for now the geese a larger and more rewarding harvest.

They had all landed by now and were hidden across the creek behind the tall hay, they were on the ridge but heading for dead centre in the fields. With only a few hundred meters apart now, I slowed down my pace and knelt forward to have a lower profile, once again my waders were sticking in the mud as I got closer to the edge of the small creek. Just like a Nile crocodile stalking wildebeest, I allowed myself to slip into the creek and moved across keeping a very low profile, never once taking my eyes off the Canada geese spotters. The geese did not stay in the same spot for long, they were scattered across the ridge and were heading over the ridge deeper into the farmland.

As the last bird sunk below the horizon near a large boulder, I climbed out of the creek and moved into the fields and managed to close the gap with the geese. I got into a good shooting position and released my first shot into the last bird but missed and the group took flight and disappeared to the East. It was quite frustrating to have missed but it happens especially in open ground, I picked up my empty shell. I then let out a few goose calls; stood up and turned back towards the creek and started to head back to the truck for a break, when all of a sudden a group of twenty geese responded to my calls and came in over head from behind heading directly north. I spun around and loaded three shells rapidly loading the last one directly into the chamber then sliding the pump-action forward and releasing my three shots into the birds, individually selecting them and leading each one based on the height and speed. The last one tilted backwards aggressively reacting to the shot but kept on flying. The first two shots out of the three were extremely close but a miss just the same. Experience has taught me to keep watching the flock as they continued their flight and sure enough the last goose started to lose altitude and drop like a world war two bomber that had been badly damaged, it dropped some more and barely cleared the tree tops and crashed into the neighbouring hay-field landing near a hay bale.

I quickly unloaded my Remington, placed it on safe and ran through the creek then several hundred meters in the southern field past the wall of brush between the two fields in the East to retrieve my harvest. I was extremely tired but very grateful for my first harvest of the day.

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Life has been extremely busy lately and there doesn’t seem to be any sign of it letting off. But I know one thing, and that is, I am extremely grateful for what I have and that I am able to practice our beloved sport. Especially with all that is going on in Texas and now Florida who will soon get hit with this incredibly nasty weather. My thoughts and prayers go to all those affected by the storms and flooding.

After a hectic day sometimes going for a drive is all that you need to clear your head, a remedy in sorts. And with the waterfowl season (Canada Geese -More Info) having just started in farmland in my district on the 6th of this month, what better way to knock out two birds with one stone…no pun intended. So, I stopped by Canadian Tire and purchased my first box of shells for the season.

Before heading to the store I checked out my ammunition boxes and noticed that I still had several Remington #3 shells left over from last season. So, I picked up a box of 12 gauge Remington Hi-Speed Steel, 3 inch in length and #2. It was a very simple purchase but a knowledgable one; the price was right at twenty-one dollars a box and I trust its performance after very successful past seasons. In a few days, I will be pursuing some geese in the fields and shall be using a mixture of #2 and #3 at various ranges. I am very excited about spending some time out in nature and hopefully bring back some birds.

Stay Safe and have a great season!

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The waterfowl season duration in the province of Quebec is just shy of four months long, roughly from early September to almost Christmas. But it doesn’t mean that as soon as the season is over and you drop your gear that you need to stop thinking about waterfowl for the rest of the year.

After all this is one of the main reasons for my blog’s existence, on the contrary you keep on learning by observing all year-long. And in some cases keep on hunting other smaller game like pigeons and crows both are hunted using the same skills and techniques.

Every day while driving to work I go by several farming fields and watch the geese fly in during the early morning hours from the safety of the river where they spent the night.

One thing that never changes in their physical behaviour, is that they always pick the middle ground, right dead center of every field. This is indeed a perfect spot, and in every sense of the choice, it provides a clear view of any danger coming in for the spotter geese and also a large landing area as well as plenty of food.

I love hunting geese from my kayak, canoe or from a blind. But I also enjoy the challenge of stalking them like a human fox. But usually the numbers in harvest are not as great as if you were in a blind.

For the stalking method, I start on the edge of the field and move my way in and get all covered up with my Real Tree jacket and gloves and lay down flat on my belly and crawl as close as I can to the birds, once in position I snap to my knees and send them into flight and attempt to harvest them.

Knowing where they land and how they setup in the middle ground allows me to study the ground and have a successful stalk and potentially a harvest.

I don’t own enough decoys yet to set up in the field with a decoy spread but if I did, the middle ground is where I would potentially be setup for my blind or in a surrounding zone aiming toward the center.

I love the summer but I can’t wait until September!

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