Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘fast steel’


The pigeons flew in very fast over head from the south in a flock of seven or more, circling around and breaking apart into smaller teams of two or three and then eventually the lead bird flying ahead for a few seconds, playing in the winds, maneuvering with skill and grace.

They wanted to land in the mud filled with corn but they were hesitant after spotting my truck with the canoe strapped to its roof and I had just opened the driver’s side door. This sent them even higher into a panicked flight, circling two more times near the southern barns before setting off to the east and over the tree line.

I would have to wait now a few minutes for them to come back and attempt to harvest a few. So, I jumped out of my seat and began unpacking my kit for the morning hunt and laying it out neatly on the tailgate.

I reached into my backpack and took out my new Tasco binoculars which I had purchased just a week ago at SAIL. I brought them up and focused in on the low ground and open fields near the creek to the south. The cold air and winds were in my favor today but there were no geese down in the low ground near the creek, this was their usual spot, but I did hear a few of them call out from above but were too high for a shot.

I continued scanning the ground and I immediately noticed the ripples in the water close to where the cattle cross the creek and there were three mallards dabbling in the water.

My initial plan for the day was to try for pigeon and then check out the open areas south of the third barn near the creek and look for woodcock, duck or geese. Now that I spotted the three mallards, two drakes and one hen, I knew that I had the time needed to come up with a plan of approach as long as something did not scare or alert the birds.

I zipped up my jacket, put on my balaclava and then loaded three shells into my Remington 870 and stood still for a few minutes looking at my two approach options, either coming in from the west from the low ground in behind the third barn and potential harvest a duck from the western corner of the barn. Maybe… I thought, but a few weeks ago, I got stuck in this same situation and the geese spotted me and flew away and had plenty of time to put some distance between me and them. There was too much open ground to cover for this choice.

So I chose to come in from the east and run up the shrub line along the creek and move my way up along its shore to the cattle crossing area. Almost a year earlier I had harvested a mallard hen in the exact same spot.

I checked over my pockets and kit and then slipped under the electric fence and started my way down through the rough terrain and across the field moving away from the ducks circling around from the east. It was quite a detour but it allowed me to move in from the left. I made about forty steps and as soon as I got into the wet grass, I flushed a woodcock which flew directly in front of me but I did not take the shot because the mallards were more interesting for a meal being a larger bird. The shot would send them flying away into the air.

Now that I had reached the shrub line and was right on the edge of the creek, I slouched forward and slowed my pace right down. I was now in the final approach and did not want to spook them into flight. My shoulders were at the same height as the tallest bushes and this provided me with the cover that I needed to close the gap between them and me.

I must have covered around thirty meters, before I had a chance to straighten up for a look, and a mallard I hadn’t seen let out a two quacks then burst into flight. This set off a second duck which was only two meters in front of me and both flew away incredibly fast. I loaded a shell into the chamber pushed the safety on and started running after the ducks for about four meters and aimed but they were too far, then all of a sudden splash another mallard shot up on my left and started to gain some distance. I aimed and released my first shot at the bird and it dropped, swerved and then flew even higher.

Now around twenty meters away, I pumped and released my second shot. In my mind I thought this shot was too far and that the mallard will get away and as soon as my shot reached the bird its head leaned forward and the duck tumbled to the ground below. I could not believe the shot.

I made my 870 safe and ran through the shallow part of the creek and started to look for the bird because it fell in the high grass. I applied what I wrote in my last blog and traced back my shot from where I was standing using my arm as a pointer and then completed five back and fourths sweeping the grass, the duck was lying in a small recess in the ground. It was a magnificent mallard drake with beautiful coloration.

A great harvest and a sure long shot!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


September twenty-eighth was going to be one of my most amazing waterfowl hunts to date and I did not even know it yet. Just like the duck hunting commercial seen on television, I was already dressed and practically geared up, while still lying in bed at about four in the morning. The canoe was on the roof of my vehicle, strapped down just hours before on Friday night.

Time is of the essence because I still had a two-hour long drive heading north where I was supposed to meet my veteran waterfowl hunting friends by the bridge in their home town. They got permission from a neighbor who was allowing us to launch our two canoes from their shoreline, which was extremely generous but it was also a more strategic launch point giving us the advantage not only for the ducks and geese but we would be higher on the river with the current in our favor.

The fog was incredibly thick on Saturday morning and made for quite an interesting drive. On occasion I was able to use my head lights and this allowed me to see a little further which helped a lot because only twenty kilometers into my drive, I spotted a deer in the ditch to my right about to come out onto the road.

It was a large doe and she was turned sideways, her silhouette is what allowed me to see her with the fog because with the color of her fur she was practically invisible. As deer get older, their fur seems to have traces of grey, which makes them harder to see.

Once I got to the bridge we had not time to waste, so we drove to their friend’s place right away and had the canoes unloaded and filled with our kit and ammunition in no time at all. We were divided in teams of two and we began opening the farming gates and carrying the canoes down to the shoreline. This was all done in the dark, it is so important to have a working headlamp. My preference is the set which has red light option; it is not as hard on the eyes but just as efficient.

The fog was very thick, just like pea soup and we could barely see a few meters on the water surface, but this was familiar territory to us, so we climbed in and pushed off then paddled into the emptiness. The water below was black and very cold, we could hear the geese in the corn fields across the river, so we paddled a little faster and headed west directly for the island.

My hunting buddies had told me that there wasn’t as much duck traffic as per usual and that the Canada geese where much more active also that they had harvested two on Friday morning. The plan for the first part of the hunt was that each hunter would cut across the island from the eastern shore to the western side putting us directly into a dis-tributary which bordered a corn field in behind the very tall tree line.

So once we reached the eastern shoreline, we quickly disembarked, unloaded the canoes and cut across the island, the distance we had to cover was about fifty meters through tall grass and small brush. Every hunter had chosen their spot to put their kit and setup, our spots gave each one of us a wide; also a safe shooting arc. Now the waiting began. By now we were well within the legal time-frame of being able to shoot, which is a half an hour before sunrise, actually we were way beyond that time but the fog was so thick that it was still seemed dark.

When I was finally sitting still in my natural blind made up of tall grass and small brush on either side of me, it was quite neat to be able see the fog dissipate with the heat of the sun but it wasn’t hot enough yet to clear it all up. It was a very eerie morning and the fog ended up staying very thick until about ten thirty in the morning which was about the time our hunt ended.

The foggy ceiling was made up of several layers and the highest one was direct inline with the tree tops. You could hear the geese calling out and depending on the height of their V-shaped formation you would not see them until they broke the top of the tree line. I would complete a few duck calls and then some geese calls, I remember reading a book about goose hunting which said that Canada geese that are used to hunters and being hunted are not as vocal as younger birds or geese that are not used to being hunted. So I adjusted my calls accordingly by not over calling.

I could hear a gaggle coming in from the corn field to the west and so I called aggressively and called again about four times and then stopped. Our group could hear them now very clear, but it was difficult to tell which direction they were coming in from, then all of a sudden a group of twenty would fly in from the south-west and appear immediately through the fog. We carefully waited for the gaggle to come into shooting range and then we released a volley of shot, the geese dispersed. I had two shells left, so I pumped my action and three geese broke formation again and headed behind me, I swiveled around toward my back, released my shot pumped and released my last shell.

The lead bird fell hard, they were incredibly high and it was without a doubt my farthest shot into the sky this year and a successful harvest. It was an extremely large bird a beautify shot indeed. More geese came in every few minutes and we reloaded our three shells and released our shots repeatedly for several geese formations. More geese fell in confirmed harvests.

Now several minutes had passed and all went silent over the river again, we called out some duck calls and seconds later three mallards flew in for a fly pass and I released two shots and harvested one of them which landed to the north-east. My hunting partner to my left harvested a wood duck moments later.

This was waterfowl action like I had never seen before, the skies were extremely active. Silenced moved in again and occasionally we could hear crows calling out and flying in, there were also flocks of rock doves flying around in groups of thirty or more.

I sat still staring toward the top of the tree line, thinking about the birds which had just flown in, when all of a sudden a gaggle of twenty geese flew in coming from the south going east and flying right over me and not one goose called out. It was an incredible sight, just hearing the swish of their wings as they broke through the thick fog.
I released a shot into the lead bird but missed and my second shell jammed causing a stoppage. By the time I cleared it, pumping my action back then forward, it was too late.

It was almost like time was frozen and to see all these geese coming through the fog was like an illusion.

When I was younger my father took me to a Cirque du Soleil show and I remember we were sitting several rows up and watching the start of the show. The center of the stage was filled with white smoke and actors, dancers came onto the stage doing somersaults under the fog and you could see the fog move around with the movement of the dancers.

There were no words to describe it, magical perhaps, well I was living the same moment over and over again with the Canada geese flying in from all directions in and out of the fog, it was simply incredible and dream like.

It is not just about the waterfowl hunt and the harvests, there is something more powerful taking place in this rich Canadian wilderness. After several successful harvests, we decided to pack up and walk the rest of the island on foot heading north-east. Another hunter had harvested a goose and it landed in the water, so I volunteered to walk up the shore and get a canoe to retrieve the bird, while I was walking three geese flew in lightning fast at water level and I swung around instinctively pushed released my safety, and put a slight lead on the last goose and released my shot harvesting the bird and it crashed into the water.

At our mornings end we our group of four hunters had harvested nine Canada geese and two mallard ducks and one wood duck. It was an incredible waterfowl experience!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: