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Posts Tagged ‘awareness’


In the past few weeks two Canadian families have been torn by a powerful sense of grief and the unimaginable while their loved ones were practicing the sport we love so much and hold dear to our hearts.

In times of emptiness like these the word accident is just one more word in a million found in the English language which is miles away in someone’s mind who has gone through such a tragic experience or loss.

An accident according to an online dictionary is an undesirable or unfortunate happening that occurs unintentionally and usually results in harm, injury, damage, or loss.
Our sport is dangerous, extremely dangerous but it does not have to be. Yet how dare we judge or preach the safe practice of firearm handling during times like these and how dare we have an opinion on someone or a situation we were not part of and have not fully understood the circumstances.

When an accident such as this occurs in our international community of hunters and to our fellow brethren, it is not criticism or judgment which should be released; rather it should be is a promise to have a higher sense of awareness and going back to the fundamentals which we were taught during our firearm and hunter courses.

A few weeks ago, I was out hunting snowshoe hare and I had to pass over a wired fence and I thought to myself, must I really unload my shotgun like I was taught? Then pass the weapon under the wire and then only pick it up and load it only once I was on the other side or should I just place it on safe and keep it in my hands? What if a hare sprints out as I am climbing over? …Maybe I will miss the shot of a lifetime. In the end I did take the time to do it right and passing the unloaded firearm under the fence. What is a few seconds more in a lifetime? Especially when you have friends, family and loved ones waiting for you at home. A great hunter is not one who brings a trophy or a harvest home every time, it is a hunter who learns and appreciates and knows their place in nature.

I shall dedicate my next hunt to the two families who have experienced extreme loss, and excruciating pain, and hopefully are heading toward the path of healing. While I stand on the damp soil of my hunting path with the fall tree colors burning around me and the breeze blowing in my face, I promise to take a moment and deep breath to think of the two young men who like me were practicing the sport we love so much.

To me they are not just another news article, they are ambassadors of safety and for this I thank them.

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In two days, I will be heading back into the woods and I can barely contain my excitement. I will have spent almost the whole week preparing my gear and rifles for the day trip. It is very difficult to describe this strange magnetic draw I feel toward the wilderness.
 
In Dianne Macmillan’s book “Life in a deciduous forest” she writes about energy and how it is transformed into food when it pertains to the relationships between the sun, the North American biome and its ecosystems, which also include wildlife.
 
She describes the different levels of a forest from high above in the canopy down through the understory and finally to the forest floor; there is in fact energy and not just at the solar or nutrient levels. She writes the following on page six: “A constant exchange of matter and energy creates a natural balance.”

It is all it takes just a few hours in the woods and I am able to grasp the balance I need. Although the majority of us live in urban areas, we are very much part of the link and this relationship that the author writes about, futhermore at the end of the book she provides websites and suggestions on activities and practices that are great for the environment.

This blog is not just about small game and varmint hunting but also about conservation, if you leave a room -shut off the light. This simple yet great gesture will indirectly affect your hunting environment in a positive way allowing you and future generations to benefit from the wilderness as well.

I highly recommend this book as it was an enjoyable read, so much so that I finished it in just two hours. The book is extremely informative and helps you better understand life in a deciduous forest and there are some great points about its wildlife such as the black bears, ruffed grouse and other small game.

Education and awareness are key, thank you Dianne!

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