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Posts Tagged ‘american’


Crow hunting is really making a come back in Quebec but it is still not as popular as it was in the 1960’s when they had serious competitions located both in the United-States and Canada. José Boily with his TV show Québec à vol d’oiseau has done great job in bringing back the interest into the sport of crow hunting and cooking. He filmed a really great segment on crow hunting and its cuisine; his shows are really entertaining but also educational.

I started hunting crow a few years ago and never used decoys or an actual caller, I just used my mouth and hands to copy various crow calls and managed to call in just a few, they were really intelligent and kept their distance, just outside my shooting range.

I thought to myself it was now time to get the right kit for some serious crow hunting, but just like any other type of hunting, it takes time and money to build up your accessories and kit in order to have a fun but also a successful hunt.

The other night I went out for supper with some friends and I had the pleasure of meeting a very generous American named Troy. It was a great night full of stories some about trapping and hunting.

I went home that night thinking of ways to improve my hunts, especially crow hunting, I decided crow and owl decoys would be my next purchase list. Little did I know, within days of meeting Troy, he had a gift for me.

Three crow and one great horned owl decoy, I was so happy, it was an awesome gift. I plan on trying out my new set using the “Crow Fighting” setup and hopefully enjoy a great meal. The American crow may be hunted under your Quebec small game permit and the dates are July 1st, 2013 to April 30, 2014. (Dates may vary depending on your zones)

Check out my video on how to field dress a crow.

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It was just another ordinary lunch hour at work for me, as I stood up after having eaten my lunch and carefully walked over to my bookshelf, reached into my plastic container which was full of loose change and grabbed a few coins, no more than two dollars as this would normally suffice.

If time permitted, I would walk about a block and pick-up a coffee but my first order of business was always going to the library bookstore to find treasures to read. Sometimes, I would go several days without finding a thing and then eventually I would spot a great book or magazine to buy.

When I walked into the shop, I would say hello to the volunteers working there, and then my search began. I have several key words in mind for my particular day which I use when scanning the book shelves on the lookout additionally it did not matter how the books were placed. My eyes would scan along for the keywords that I had in mind, then they would literally jump out from the books and I then grabbed it my hand and usually within seconds had already decided if it is worth holding or not.

With my amazing snow goose hunt still fresh in my mind and just a few days old, I noticed the words “Shotgun” and “Digest”. Any book with the word “Digest” is almost always a great read and I learn so much or it is a great review.

I pull out the paperback from amongst the other books and it was the “Shotgun Digest” by Robert Stack. Today I thought to myself I scored! The author’s name did not hit me at first, until I started reading the book on the way home that evening and read the Dedication which was written for Clark Gable.

Robert Stack from the Unsolved Mysteries television show was a champion skeet shooter and loved waterfowl hunting as much as I do. I could not believe that he wrote a book about shot gunning, additionally he was great friends with Clark Gable who was also an accomplished marksman and waterfowler.

He also wrote about Lee Marvin another accomplished hunter in the book on page forty-eight which had the chapter title of dynamics of dove downing. These old pages are a true pleasure to read, and you can find the following topics: Choosing the right shotgun, fitting the gun to you, shotshell, reloading techniques, facts on recoil, ballistics and chokes, skeet and trapshooting hows and whys, and the chapters I can’t wait to finish are Waterfowl and Upland Game Shooting Techniques.

Through these old pages, I will be learning and reviewing and it is such a treat. Veterans, actors and hunters a fine read indeed.

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Canadian Hunter

I find myself sometimes sitting in my office staring at my computer screen, all the while clients are coming in an out for all types of urgent reasons. It is a mad rush. You do your best to fight the current trying to avoid getting caught up in it all. Yet you are bound by an obligation to provide services faster than the eye can see. You are a small part of this society, which we have labelled with flags and governments all mixed up with history and culture.

Your lavish titles dictate your status in this world which we have ultimately created. It is in a sense an artificial place and we are all desperately trying to make our mark. In order to stay healthy both physically and mentally in this environment, we need a release to maintain a much-needed balance in our lives.

Mine like many others is hunting and not just the harvesting aspect but the whole experience of being in the wilderness. When I am walking through the woods surrounded by trees or in the meadows, my inner battery is being recharged. My hunter friend described the feeling as being more alive when he is in woods. This is so true and it gets me thinking about the concrete jungle that I have left behind.

I stare at the trees, rock cliffs, the snow and the leaves and this is when it all becomes so clear. This is where we came from, it is our roots the birth of our existence and yet in pursuit for advancement we have made ourselves foreign to our very place of origin, the wilderness.

For those who have lost touch with nature, they have broken a critical link to their origins and if exposed to their own original biome they would surely perish due to lack of knowledge either under the claws of predators or the wicked cold of the north.

Hunters guard this relationship with nature every time they step out into the wilderness. This link to our origins is kept alive in a healthy equilibrium by those who hunt; the natives understand this and have been trying to share this message with us for centuries.
I believe the passion in hunting is about living the moment and knowing that you are doing your share in re-enforcing this link to our roots all the while enjoying your sport.

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