Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘12 gauge’


Life has been extremely busy lately and there doesn’t seem to be any sign of it letting off. But I know one thing, and that is, I am extremely grateful for what I have and that I am able to practice our beloved sport. Especially with all that is going on in Texas and now Florida who will soon get hit with this incredibly nasty weather. My thoughts and prayers go to all those affected by the storms and flooding.

After a hectic day sometimes going for a drive is all that you need to clear your head, a remedy in sorts. And with the waterfowl season (Canada Geese -More Info) having just started in farmland in my district on the 6th of this month, what better way to knock out two birds with one stone…no pun intended. So, I stopped by Canadian Tire and purchased my first box of shells for the season.

Before heading to the store I checked out my ammunition boxes and noticed that I still had several Remington #3 shells left over from last season. So, I picked up a box of 12 gauge Remington Hi-Speed Steel, 3 inch in length and #2. It was a very simple purchase but a knowledgable one; the price was right at twenty-one dollars a box and I trust its performance after very successful past seasons. In a few days, I will be pursuing some geese in the fields and shall be using a mixture of #2 and #3 at various ranges. I am very excited about spending some time out in nature and hopefully bring back some birds.

Stay Safe and have a great season!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


Golfers standing at their first hole just know when he or she has hit a great ball. You can hear the ping sound as your curved wood follows through the air chasing the perfect ball right after contact. You can also feel a slight vibration come up the pole and into your hands. Your swing was flawless and your muscles are totally relaxed yet in full control.

It is a wonderful feeling to see the ball fly directly into the air dead center down your lane. Your game no matter what the score feels great.

It is in fact incredible to finally see that your skill is showing and that you have mastered the stroke. But then there is this unexplained bit. Almost faith; you have taken the shot and you expect to hit something but it could be a slice or maybe not. You know one thing it felt right!

On my last rock dove hunt just a couple of weeks ago, I was walking up the western ridge of the farm heading east. I spotted four pigeons flying around in a spiral formation and then landing out of sight to my front. I kept on walking slowly toward them, and made my way over the gate between the two barns and then reloaded my Winchester 97 pushing a shell into the tubular magazine below until I heard the click and then pumped the action to chamber the shell. It is a beautiful piece of history made of steel and wood.

Now only thirty meters away but well within sight, the rock doves burst back into flight in a diamond shape going south, I shouldered my shotgun and lined up the bead sight directly in line with the last pigeon and moved it one inch to the front of its beak just as Robert Stack had recommended to do in his shotgun book.

I slowly squeezed the trigger and released my shot. This all happened within a few seconds. And once the smoke cleared, I released the action pushing on the slide lock release plunger pin, and the empty shell ejected and spun through the air leaving a spiral of smoke, just like a cigarette would when you flicked it out of your fingers before stepping on it.

The rock dove tumbled and dropped like a stone, I knew it was an incredible shot, part of this success was skill and experience but there was a little bit of faith. After all hunting is never a guarantee.

Read Full Post »


My watercolor of a Ruffed Grouse

The Ruffed Grouse is a game bird that weighs just under two pounds and is found in the forests of Quebec. It can be hunted under the provincial small game permit during its fall seasons. For more information on the season dates and hunting regulations pertaining to Ruffed Grouse please visit the MRNF website.

The Ruffed Grouse can be found along wooded trails near stumps an Aspen trees or freshly grown evergreen trees and they blend in extremely well into their surroundings. Listen for the drumming of the males to help you spot them before they fly away. Just like hares they use the same network of paths in the woods, so if a grouse flies off keep your eyes on the bird and attempt to see where it landed in order to close in and make the shot.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: