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Archive for September, 2017


My plan was to get to my friends farm early enough in the morning, just before the geese fly and land into the farmland to feed for the day. When I left the house, I had loaded up all my kit into the truck and I was just glowing. I was ready for my outing. I hadn’t even gone up the road past the local Tim-Horton coffee shop and I was already feeling like I had just won the lottery, and this was without a harvest yet.

I have been driving these road for several years now and I know every bend in the road and do not miss any of its fine details; my truck was slipping in an out of the dips in the road like a soft sheet floating in the breeze. It is in times like these when you learn to let go of the weights of every day stress as you head deeper into the country side. An hour or so had gone by and I was now nearing my destination. About a kilometer out, I had noticed about twenty Canada geese in the neighbouring fields but none in the area where I was going to be, yet I did not let this discourage me and continued on.

I like to try different techniques and tricks during my hunts, so that the experience is never the same and I learn what works and what doesn’t. On this particular day I was going to use my goose caller and call a heck of a lot and see if I would trigger something or attract geese. After having rolled up the dirt road and jumped out of the truck, I noticed four rock doves fly in and land in the low ground to the North-West right near the tree line on the right about three hundred meters out. Without any geese the in the farmland, I decided to set off toward the pigeons and attempt to harvest one of two before the geese flew in, I had to circle around coming in from the East just a few meters in from the tree line, the problem was with all the rain we had this summer, my hip waders were getting stuck in the mud and making a suction sound every time I freed myself from the mud.

I did not want to trigger and alarm the birds and send them into flight, it was hard work and I was breathing heavy by the time I got within shooting range. The doves were higher than me on a ridge and it was not a safe shot, I had to wait for them to come down lower and close the gap between them and I. They would feed and zig zag in an out of the thorn bushes and then fly around nervously and land only meters from where they took off, if you can successfully stalk rock doves in farmland, then you have what it takes to sneak up to Canada geese in an open field.

I now had a clear shot on the first pigeon and was only seconds from taking my shot, when all of sudden the time had come, I heard goose calls coming in from the tree tops and then they flew right over my position headed directly south past the creek and then landed in the southern field on top of its ridge. Their honk calls were short and repeated quickly in repetition, with their feet out and floating down to earth with the inward curved wing formation, it was a beautiful sight. I quickly, unloaded my two fast steel shells, placed my Remington on safe, sprung up and started to sprint in the direction of the geese. This sent the pigeons into flight and they quickly flew off over the forest heading east to the neighbours farm, we would meet again but for now the geese a larger and more rewarding harvest.

They had all landed by now and were hidden across the creek behind the tall hay, they were on the ridge but heading for dead centre in the fields. With only a few hundred meters apart now, I slowed down my pace and knelt forward to have a lower profile, once again my waders were sticking in the mud as I got closer to the edge of the small creek. Just like a Nile crocodile stalking wildebeest, I allowed myself to slip into the creek and moved across keeping a very low profile, never once taking my eyes off the Canada geese spotters. The geese did not stay in the same spot for long, they were scattered across the ridge and were heading over the ridge deeper into the farmland.

As the last bird sunk below the horizon near a large boulder, I climbed out of the creek and moved into the fields and managed to close the gap with the geese. I got into a good shooting position and released my first shot into the last bird but missed and the group took flight and disappeared to the East. It was quite frustrating to have missed but it happens especially in open ground, I picked up my empty shell. I then let out a few goose calls; stood up and turned back towards the creek and started to head back to the truck for a break, when all of a sudden a group of twenty geese responded to my calls and came in over head from behind heading directly north. I spun around and loaded three shells rapidly loading the last one directly into the chamber then sliding the pump-action forward and releasing my three shots into the birds, individually selecting them and leading each one based on the height and speed. The last one tilted backwards aggressively reacting to the shot but kept on flying. The first two shots out of the three were extremely close but a miss just the same. Experience has taught me to keep watching the flock as they continued their flight and sure enough the last goose started to lose altitude and drop like a world war two bomber that had been badly damaged, it dropped some more and barely cleared the tree tops and crashed into the neighbouring hay-field landing near a hay bale.

I quickly unloaded my Remington, placed it on safe and ran through the creek then several hundred meters in the southern field past the wall of brush between the two fields in the East to retrieve my harvest. I was extremely tired but very grateful for my first harvest of the day.

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Life has been extremely busy lately and there doesn’t seem to be any sign of it letting off. But I know one thing, and that is, I am extremely grateful for what I have and that I am able to practice our beloved sport. Especially with all that is going on in Texas and now Florida who will soon get hit with this incredibly nasty weather. My thoughts and prayers go to all those affected by the storms and flooding.

After a hectic day sometimes going for a drive is all that you need to clear your head, a remedy in sorts. And with the waterfowl season (Canada Geese -More Info) having just started in farmland in my district on the 6th of this month, what better way to knock out two birds with one stone…no pun intended. So, I stopped by Canadian Tire and purchased my first box shells of the season.

Before heading to the store I checked out my ammunition boxes and noticed that I still had several Remington #3 shells left over from last season. So, I picked up a box of 12 gauge Remington Hi-Speed Steel, 3 inch in length and #2. It was a very simple purchase but a knowledgable one; the price was right at twenty-one dollars a box and I trust its performance after very successful past seasons. In a few days, I will be pursuing some geese in the fields and shall be using a mixture of #2 and #3 at various ranges. I am very excited about spending some time out in nature and hopefully bring back some birds.

Stay Safe and have a great season!

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