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Archive for October, 2014


Well it was about that time in the morning that I stood with everyone else at the stop waiting for the bus to head into work. Most people were still half asleep, others were glued to their mobile devices; some were smoking or simply talking to the person next to them.

As for me, my eyes were up in the sky looking at the geese flying overhead coming in from the river just south, heading to the fields about two kilometers north for the day to feed. I was listening to their calls, watching them fly over in formation but I also kept an eye on the time.

Hunters can head into farm areas or wetlands and hope to harvest a duck or two all throughout the day but you can definitely increase your chances of having greater success, if you choose the right time of day to hunt.

To the others in my queue at the bus stop, the geese were either part of the fall scenery or simply nuisance birds, but what they do not realize is that these birds were sharing vital information regarding their resting and feeding spots in addition they were also providing the exact time when a waterfowler can maximize his or her chances of having a great harvest.

I have found that the golden minutes at dawn are thirty minutes before sunrise and at dusk they are the half an hour after sundown. The advantage at dawn is that you can continue hunting throughout the morning but at dusk, it is a very small window of time and managing this period is very important to give yourselves the opportunity to set up your blinds and decoy spreads in order to capitalize on the exact time.

There are great tools at your disposal, websites containing the sunrise and sundown information and some GPS models even have it integrated and can provide you with the sunrise and sundown time for your geographical area.

I always carry a head lamp, my gun case and trigger locks with me for the hunts at dusk, so that I can secure my shotgun in accordance with the federal and provincial laws, it is safe and you will also avoid heavy fines.

Have a great time and be safe!

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The red and yellow colors of the fall foliage were breathtaking and the wind was blowing in strong and seemed to be coming in from all directions. The wind currents would sneak in and out like a slithering snake up through the grass and go over the tree tops and then come back around and hit us in the back.

I opened the passenger side door and hopped out of the truck with my right hand still on the inside door handle for leverage and then I made my way to the back in order to load my kit into the Jon boat. We then took turns loosening the straps to lower the boat into the water while sliding it off the trailer guides.

I suited up into my waders and with the rope guided the boat into the water up to my waist, I can confirm that Aquaseal did the job; no more leaks and my inner trousers were dry.

The three of us were very happy and excited about the hunt ahead, yet we all shared some concerns regarding the winds. Before leaving the house we worked on the decoy weights to ensure our spread did not get affected by the wind, and that the birds would not float away.

Once the boat was loaded up with the kit, the group jumped into the boat, then we took off across the open waters to the wetlands heading south-east; it took us about fifteen minutes to get to our chosen spot.

During our decoy setup my friend did not want to use a traditional decoy spread like a W or V shape layout, he rather use a long spread of geese consisted of about twelve geese and then creating a large landing strip in the middle between us and the geese. We then scattered ducks closest to our blind and to our left.  The landing strip was about thirty-five feet wide and no birds on either ends, leaving it open from the left and right.

It worked really well, once the geese started coming in, they circled above completed several turns in the air and came down meters in front of us. We were facing south with our backs to the north and the geese were flying in from the east and west.

On the signal of the lead shooter, we stood up and the birds burst back into flight, this is when we released our shots just feet from the water’s surface. Seeing geese flying in from above is just amazing and it is something I could watch over and over again.

We knew that there was one particular group of about twenty geese that flew in for the evening in the area where we setup and that this was great opportunity and a good hunt during the last thirty minutes of legal shooting, but instead on this particular afternoon we got small groups of two, three, four and sometimes five birds fly within minutes of each other, some geese would call and others not.

It was an incredibly charged hunt, between the waves of geese, we barely had enough time to fumble through our shells and get three loaded back into our shotguns then it was already time to shoot again.

In the end we had harvested ten magnificent Canada geese and I considered this hunt to be one of my best hunts on the wetlands so far this year.

I am always searching for ways to improve my harvests but also keeping the hunts safe, one thing our group does is that when we are in a standing blind configuration, we always identify our shooting arcs, so that no one crosses over into the other shooters lanes.

When recovering the birds with the assistance of a dog, depending on the scenario, we either unload our shotguns or put the safety on and ensure they are always pointing in safe direction. At times I have found myself on my hands and knees leaning forward pulling the dog and the bird back into the boat and this is working in a very tight space. In a situation like this for example, I would immediately unload before moving around in the blind.

Another practice our group uses for quick shotgun shell access is that we empty the shell box into our front pocket and leave the flap open, this way you can reach in and grab a shell and make it ready to put into the shotgun chamber or load into the tubular magazine. I also carry and twenty-five shell belt, which allows you to have a full shell box placed into a belt and when firing your three shells, you can easily grab one shell and reload quickly from the belt into the shotgun, making it ready for the next shot.

It is incredibly easy even for an experienced hunter to get over excited when seeing several birds coming in to your spread. Take deep breaths, calm right down and take your time and make every shot count, aim for one bird at a time. Depending on the size of the geese and distance sometimes it may take two shots, especially if you have a pump shotgun, make sure you pump the slide action right back and forward to eject the empty shell and load a new shell. If this is done properly, especially with three-inch shells you can avoid jams, which may result in a miss.

Keep it safe and have a great rest of the season!

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Chest Deep


I can still remember the experience of getting my first pair of waders like it was yesterday; I remember driving to the store, trying them on, placing myself in various shooting positions, looking in the mirror, bending my knees ensuring they were the right fit. I was incredibly excited and could not wait to get into them and hit the wetlands. I had conducted research and read reviews but I was not too familiar with brand names and their types, one thing was certain they had to be chest high.

I ended up purchasing the Blue Bill Camo Breathable Bootfoot Waders made by the Allen Company. I love my waders and I am very happy with the product, but at the time of the purchase I did not put too much consideration into their one year warranty for my waders but I remember thinking it was quite short. This is an element for some hunting products which I simply do not understand, if you make a great product and you know it is a great product, why not have a lifetime warranty?

Last weekend I was on an early morning duck hunt, I had harvested my first wood duck of the day and it landed on my left in the creek, the depth was just below chest deep . The black lab which we had with us that morning was further down the creek; therefore I decided to retrieve the bird on my own.

I made my shotgun safe and stepped into the cold waters, everything was going well, until I felt my wallet in my back pocket starting to getting wet and then it dawned on me, I had a hole in my waders and my warranty was up.

I was gutted! First thing I did when I got home is I started to do additional research on how repair holes or tears in waders and came across the McNett Aquaseal product. The YouTube video was great. Now three days have passed and I purchased the McNett Aquaseal product, identified the three holes in the waders and applied the urethane rubber sealant in a rectangular shape using small flat Popsicle stick over the holes.

It is now curing as I am typing; and I shall be back on the river very soon and you bet your ducks I will be keeping an eye on this product.

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The sky was filled with majestic dark clouds, it gave you the impression that I was going to be swallowed into the darkness of the night but it was only four in the afternoon and I had several hours ahead of me in the wetlands. The sun would break through between the clouds and their edges would then turn bright orange like they were burning, the colors all around me would change, the shadows became very clear and then as soon as it changed just like a wave it turned back to its yellows and browns once the sun was hidden again.

I sat in my truck for some time before my hunt was going to start, then took a few deep breaths, said a prayer and asked the powers that be for a great hunt. I was a very happy man. My experience has taught me that if you go out thinking your going try hard to harvest something, it will not happen, you have no control over nature. You have to use your knowledge and let things happen and if an opportunity presents itself then you must grasp that slice of time.

The sights and smells in the wetlands, would render any man humble and make them realize how small we are in this world. The endless isolated dark waters and the tall grass grow in a dangerous maze. We will come and go, but nature will always be there with its creatures and be so powerful as it is.

I dragged my kayak out of the truck bed, rigged up my gear, climbed into my waders and headed off down the muddy trail; my boots were instantly sucked into the mud which then released the swamp smell after each step. It was very slippery and at times, I would pull my boat onto the grass to facilitate the drag.

The water levels this year are very low in the wetlands, forcing me to work my way down the trail to the deeper waters several hundred meters away. Even with the rain we have had in the recent days it hasn’t helped and this makes paddling quite a chore through the weeds.

I placed my shotgun at the ready state with the safe on in its front mount of the kayak and then I pulled the boat through the swamp grass and weeds until I sank into my hips and then I would climb into the boat and push-off with my paddle once it was too deep. Every time I do this, I think of the scene in the movie “African Queen”, it is extremely hard work and requires an incredible amount of physical strength. The weeds wrap themselves around my paddle like a spider web and it makes it very difficult to move as well as exhausting, it is a battle to make it to the deeper waters.

Moments later I am floating through the tall grass, sneaking in and out of the waterways flushing wood ducks and green winged teal. I feel a sudden rush of freedom, the kayak gives me the ability to get within meters of the blue herons and they only burst into the flight once I am just feet away, this is exactly the skill I am using with ducks.

Right now the birds I see the most are, green and blue winged teal, wood ducks and Canada Geese, the mallards and black ducks are not as present.

Teal are incredible birds, flying very low and unimaginably fast, unlike mallards or black ducks they remind me of fighter jets, moving in formation with lightning speed. Any gunner who is able to take one down in flight has my instant respect; it takes quick movements and precision shooting and the ability to interpret the birds.

I paddled up and down the north-eastern side of the marsh, winding through grassy canals, flushing ducks. Sometimes I would stop paddling allowing myself to coast along and then stop inside a patch of tall swamp grass and wait several minutes, almost like an instant blind configuration.

Then if there were no ducks, I would move again. My kayak is so stable, I can switch from sitting in the boat to flipping onto my knees, which provides a better shooting base and I can also rotate for harder angled shots.

On my way back to the east, I paddled a few more stokes and then on my right a green winged teal burst into the flight, she then turned in mid-air and started maneuvering, through the cat tail which was shaped like of canyon. The teal was going to disappear into this water canal and I only had milliseconds to release my shot, I dropped my paddle that is rigged with bungee cord and carabiners so I do not lose it; shouldered my shotgun, pushed it off safe, angled my body to the left then fired my shot.

There is a reason why the wetlands call me back and it is not just the wildlife, I am unable to put it into words, you have to experience it.

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I am constantly searching for ways to improve my chances at harvesting game, especially during the waterfowl season. For example, we know that scouting days before the season is a great method of increasing your chances in getting a harvest; learning where the birds are, but also identifying where they set in specific spots on the river or fields. Study their flight routes at dawn and dusk, locating where they feed in the fields.

Weeks before the hunting season some waterfowlers I know watch more videos and read more magazines, books and articles online, in order to add to their knowledge and ultimately have a better understanding on the birds, their feeding, flying and resting habits. It is also a great way to spend time with friends off-season and a time to share stories and get pumped up for the upcoming season. This type of information you get from shows or articles, also introduces new technologies, new laws, regulations as well as new products that can assist in improving your chances. However, this knowledge is also acquired through years of experience, especially if you hunt in the same areas.

There is however one reality to hunting which every hunter knows and this that there is no guarantee, some days you will go home without a harvest, even if you execute a perfect plan, best blind setup, brilliant decoy spread but the birds just do not come in or if they do, their numbers are less, harder shots or maybe they just simply fly too high.

It is a lot of work, money and time making your way to the river or fields and when these lulls occur, it can be incredibly discouraging for hunters, especially to hunters that are new to the sport.

If this happens to you, don’t worry, you are not alone. Things will pick up and you will have incredible hunts. I once read a book about turkey hunting and the author wrote that when you are sitting at the base of a tree, calling and waiting for the turkeys to come into your decoys, and you do not see a bird and it feels like you have been waiting for an eternity and you just want to leave. He wrote wait fifteen more minutes, who knows you might get lucky.

This is a true formula indeed, it has happened to me on several different hunts, I start heading back to my truck to shut down for the day without a harvest and then right at the last-minute an opportunity presented itself.

Last night, I was on the river and there were ducks and geese around but we were experiencing a lull, we were getting close to the end of the hunt with only the last thirty minutes left and all of a sudden a group of seven geese came in low in the dark sky without calling or making a sound and they were in the perfect shooting height, angle and speed.

Fight the urge of shutting down early because it is getting dark, you are tired, wet and discouraged, who knows what the very last legal minute might bring.

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